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Thread: Residential Electrical Permits in Ohio

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jselesk2 View Post
    I worked under a licensed electrical contractor for about a year then left. I felt I wasn't learning fast enough and I knew I could learn much faster on my own time.
    How much experience do you have? Any military or classes taken ?

    When you say that you can learn faster on your on time how do you accomplish this?

    If you are really good you should be able to convince and employer to pay you more than $13.50 an hour.
    The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jselesk2 View Post
    This is my opinion, but I believe the only thing the state should really care about is whether or not you possess the knowledge to install electrical systems safely and correctly - and that is it. Working under a licensed contractor for 5 years does not necessarily mean you know all of the code and are able to install safe and reliable electrical systems. I know plenty of guys that worked under a relative's license for years but still don't have a firm grasp on the code or electricity in general. The "tips and tricks" of the trade that I may or may not posses as an electrician should not be of any concern to the state. As far as my experience goes, I worked under a licensed electrical contractor for about a year then left. I felt I wasn't learning fast enough and I knew I could learn much faster on my own time. My superior who worked with me didn't even know how a GFI receptacle operated although he's been an electrician for 15 years. I was making $13.50 an hour. Why should I have to endure that for years when I am confident in my skills now? I think it's an absurd requirement probably conspired by the state's large electrical contractors to limit competition.
    Most places have fairly similar requirements - you are not going to just get a license without verification of experience they require to attain said license. Most places you need to attain a journeymen license before you are eligible to attain any higher licensing. Have you even gotten to that level?

    Quote Originally Posted by growler View Post
    How much experience do you have? Any military or classes taken ?

    When you say that you can learn faster on your on time how do you accomplish this?

    If you are really good you should be able to convince and employer to pay you more than $13.50 an hour.
    Or find someone that will pay you more. Like I questioned before - has OP even attained a journeyman license? Might be a big help if one wants to be paid journeyman wages.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  3. #13
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    Boy I tell you the OP thinks that Someone is going to just Hand him a license because he is book smart. That is not going to happen unless you falsely state your qualifications.

    You need boots on the ground experience. Its not about knowing how to look up a code in a book.
    That means how to wire a home competently, Know the minimum code requirements as well as what is a upgrade.
    Proper drilling and notching.
    Proper box setting and size of conductor fill.
    proper size of conductors.
    For commercial you need to know how to bend pipe, pulling wire, mounting panels, stuff that is not in the book and the only way to learn is in the field working for someone else. If one company is not doing it for you then go to another. Find a contractor willing to train you and be glad he is willing to do so.
    You want to shortcut. There is no way you shortcut training in the field.
    I despise those like you because they are always causing trouble when I have to bid against them as workers like you over look items or just don't understand what it takes to do the work.
    Otherwise you could be overdoing and over charging. or providing unsafe electrical.


    I will tell you this , with your tude you are probably difficult to employ.

    Drop the Tude and follow the program or move to more relaxed state or find another trade.

  4. #14
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    Welcome to The Forum

    You may be exceptionally intelligent, a fast learner, intuitively know how to do things that others take years to learn, however you still have to go through the same process as everyone else.

    I got my Virginia class 1 Wastewater license when I was 25, and I finished four year apprenticeship program 4 days after September 11th. Not only was I valedictorian of my class, to date I still have the highest GPA of anyone to ever graduate that program. That and a buck-fifty will get me a cup of coffee, and I still like everyone else, have to spend five years under a licensed electrician. The rules are designed for everyone, and it doesn't matter where on the bell curve you fall... even if you're the one who breaks the bell curve...

    The first four years I was into electrical, I work for a low voltage contractor. He knew all the codes, how to do it, but was not license, so guess what? None of that time counted. When I found out, to say that I was unhappy with a serious understatement.

    Setbacks are a part of life. How you deal with them is up to you

    I understand the original posters mentality, I was probably once a lot like he was. Reviews like everyone else, even doing menial things... A lot of electrical work is really really trivial, boring, repetitive stuff, but it's not like you're going to get design electrical system for a particle accelerator or for a Mars space station... Maybe you will maybe you will be that guy. until then, you will be digging trenches, putting on wire nuts, installing Romex, drilling holes, Etc all the stuff that is rote to us all. If it was all fun, interesting, or exciting, it wouldn't be work, would it?

    If you really hate the process that much, and think it is unfair, you have two choices... You can do something else or get in a position to change it.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jselesk2 View Post
    Why in the world isn't there an alternative path set up to allow people who already have the knowledge and skill to be able to work as an independent electrical contractor? To me this seems absurd. Does anyone know of an alternative way?

    There is an alternative path to becoming an electrical contractor. You can start an electrical business and hire a licensed master electrician to sponsor your company.
    The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

  6. #16
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    Is this DIY?

    The reason I ask is most localities allow the home owner to do electrical or most any construction work within their own residence. I heard some in localities you must pass a basic test but any homeowner should be able to pull their own permits. After all the work is inspected.

    Now pulling a permit to help your neighbor or a friend is generally over the line because then you are acting as a contractor.

    But are there actually localities where owner residential DIY electrical work is not allowed? I would think that could be challenged in court.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Delle View Post
    The reason I ask is most localities allow the home owner to do electrical or most any construction work within their own residence. I heard some in localities you must pass a basic test but any homeowner should be able to pull their own permits. After all the work is inspected.

    Now pulling a permit to help your neighbor or a friend is generally over the line because then you are acting as a contractor.

    But are there actually localities where owner residential DIY electrical work is not allowed? I would think that could be challenged in court.
    The OP is not a DIY, he is a unlicensed contractor wishing to obtain his own permits. Unfortunately Ohio only allows a licensed contractor to obtain permits for work other than his own property.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sierrasparky View Post
    The OP is not a DIY, he is a unlicensed contractor wishing to obtain his own permits. Unfortunately Ohio only allows a licensed contractor to obtain permits for work other than his own property.
    That makes sense. Does any AHJ allow a non licensed contractor to pull permits outside of owner residential?

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Delle View Post
    That makes sense. Does any AHJ allow a non licensed contractor to pull permits outside of owner residential?
    Non Licensed contractor cannot get permits unless it is their home
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    Non Licensed contractor cannot get permits unless it is their home
    not that I want to encourage the original poster or anyone else to continue a path of lawlessness, but this is absolutely not true. The aforementioned gentleman I work for when I was doing low voltage work was a licensed contractor, but not a licensed electrician. Yet somehow he managed to pull permits on 18 commercial hotel jobs in a four-year span. As far as I know he's still in business. But that's doing communication work for the owner, and the owner may have pulled the permits for the hotels.

    I've said before that inspectors do not pay much attention to chapter 8 installs. I got more scrutiny from a local inspector building a 3 by 6 deck on the front of my aunts house then I did in all of those 18 commercial jobs put together.

    If the op wants to do a job that requires a permit, he will have to go one of the ways I said or start his own company and hire a licensed electrician... Or be relegated to what many here would call hack work or trunk slamming.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

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