Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Residential Electrical Permits in Ohio

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    14

    Residential Electrical Permits in Ohio

    Hello everyone,

    Hoping to find some Ohioans on here who can give me some advice...

    So, it appears that in order to be able to obtain an electrical permit in 99% of the cities in Ohio, one must be licensed as a commercial electrical contractor with the state, as 99% of the cities require this. It appears that this is the ONLY way to obtain electrical permits in most cities in Ohio. First of all, if anyone has any information citing otherwise, please correct me.

    Now, in order to obtain a state commercial electrical license in Ohio, one must spend 5 years working under a licensed electrical contractor, having completed at least 1 job requiring a permit for each of the 5 years in order to be eligible to apply for the state examination that will award a license upon a passing grade.

    Now I'm going to vent a little bit... I think this setup it total BS. Why should I have to waste 5 years of my life working as an electrician employee performing menial tasks that I already know how to do in order to be able to do residential electrical work? Why in the world isn't there an alternative path set up to allow people who already have the knowledge and skill to be able to work as an independent electrical contractor? To me this seems absurd. Does anyone know of an alternative way?
    Last edited by jselesk2; 04-13-18 at 11:44 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    226
    Welcome from across town, or maybe down the street.
    Not an EC, just a guy that throws plans at you and say build it. You must of gained your experience working under a licensed shop...no. Doesn't all that time apply towards your 5 years ? With that under your belt, could you approach a licensed shop and work under their umbrella ?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    33,333
    Most states require a certain number of hours to get a license. NC requires about 4,000 (2 years) to get a limited license. How can you get experience as a worker if you are working for yourself without a license (in most states that is illegal and you can get fined or more).

    The only way the state can be assured you know what you are doing is to have you work for someone. Granted there are people who are book smart and can pass an exam but honestly that would not be the type of person I would want working on my house. There are all kinds of tricks and methods that one learns working with someone.

    Granted not all contractors are worth working for but how else can the state be assured you have the experience-- working illegally is not the way to expect a handout. I have no idea if that is what you have done but I am trying to show you that there is a reason for the requirement.

    In NC we have different levels of licensing each requiring a different level of experience. I have my unlimited by I have rarely worked in commercial settings. I did as a kid with my dad but that was the brunt of it.

    We have limited, intermediate as well as unlimted but we also have licenses for wiring well pumps, single family dwellings, etc. Perhaps Ohio should try a residential or a limited type of license
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Atlanta,GA
    Posts
    5,841
    Quote Originally Posted by jselesk2 View Post
    Why should I have to waste 5 years of my life working as an electrician employee performing menial tasks that I already know how to do in order to be able to do residential electrical work?
    It's not really a waste of time. You can often make more money working as an electrician for a bigger company than you can as a small time EC.

    As an employee you don't always perform menial task. I ran much bigger jobs as an employee than I have ever done on my own. You can gain some very valuable experience while someone else is paying for it.

    I don't know how old you are or experience level or anything like that but here is how it works. The very minute you get your license you are glad that it's not all that easy, if it was then everyone would have one and there is already enough competition.
    The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    37,157
    Residential work has been more difficult to keep up with code changes the past 20 years or so then other types of work.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    Most states require a certain number of hours to get a license. NC requires about 4,000 (2 years) to get a limited license. How can you get experience as a worker if you are working for yourself without a license (in most states that is illegal and you can get fined or more).

    The only way the state can be assured you know what you are doing is to have you work for someone. Granted there are people who are book smart and can pass an exam but honestly that would not be the type of person I would want working on my house. There are all kinds of tricks and methods that one learns working with someone.

    Granted not all contractors are worth working for but how else can the state be assured you have the experience-- working illegally is not the way to expect a handout. I have no idea if that is what you have done but I am trying to show you that there is a reason for the requirement.

    In NC we have different levels of licensing each requiring a different level of experience. I have my unlimited by I have rarely worked in commercial settings. I did as a kid with my dad but that was the brunt of it.

    We have limited, intermediate as well as unlimted but we also have licenses for wiring well pumps, single family dwellings, etc. Perhaps Ohio should try a residential or a limited type of license

    This is my opinion, but I believe the only thing the state should really care about is whether or not you possess the knowledge to install electrical systems safely and correctly - and that is it. Working under a licensed contractor for 5 years does not necessarily mean you know all of the code and are able to install safe and reliable electrical systems. I know plenty of guys that worked under a relative's license for years but still don't have a firm grasp on the code or electricity in general. The "tips and tricks" of the trade that I may or may not posses as an electrician should not be of any concern to the state. As far as my experience goes, I worked under a licensed electrical contractor for about a year then left. I felt I wasn't learning fast enough and I knew I could learn much faster on my own time. My superior who worked with me didn't even know how a GFI receptacle operated although he's been an electrician for 15 years. I was making $13.50 an hour. Why should I have to endure that for years when I am confident in my skills now? I think it's an absurd requirement probably conspired by the state's large electrical contractors to limit competition.
    Last edited by jselesk2; 04-15-18 at 07:24 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by growler View Post
    It's not really a waste of time. You can often make more money working as an electrician for a bigger company than you can as a small time EC.
    Not true in my experience. I worked as an electrician employee making $13.50 an hour

    Quote Originally Posted by growler View Post
    As an employee you don't always perform menial task. I ran much bigger jobs as an employee than I have ever done on my own. You can gain some very valuable experience while someone else is paying for it.
    Yes, I did learn some valuable things as an employee, but I felt that it was nothing I couldn't teach myself.

    Quote Originally Posted by growler View Post
    The very minute you get your license you are glad that it's not all that easy, if it was then everyone would have one and there is already enough competition.
    I disagree. There is so much more to standing out and being a successful electrical contractor than merely possessing a license. If I were already a licensed electrician, the ease of which someone would be able to obtain a license wouldn't bother me at all.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by MyCleveland View Post
    Welcome from across town, or maybe down the street.
    Not an EC, just a guy that throws plans at you and say build it. You must of gained your experience working under a licensed shop...no. Doesn't all that time apply towards your 5 years ? With that under your belt, could you approach a licensed shop and work under their umbrella ?
    Yes I could, but I would be taking a significant pay cut.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    1,000
    I’m not completly sure if something has changed recently but let me take a stab at it.

    As far as I know you should only need 4 years of apprentice training (which is often provided by any electrical contractor who is enrolled with various union or non-union training entities. For example I was enrolled with ABC (associated builders and contractors) and have provided on the job training hours while the training agency provides the classroom hours. Cost handling can vary whether you pick up all costs or employer shares in costs.)

    After which you have completed the 4000 hours you are eligible to take the states contractor electrical exam to become licensed.

    Now the thing you may find is that finding contractors who have had to go thru this same process may be few and far in between because many electrical contractors (myself included) were grand-fathered in when this whole process was implemented about 15-18 years ago.
    Needless to say I don’t think there are many guys out there that have gone through the hoops to start a contracting business due to this, now leaving us with a shortage of licensed contractors/skilled electrical trades people along with the fact it’s hard to find skilled workers period.

    Most of my work is in a couple of those 1% of cities which do not have residential inspections but still due my best to police myself with the code.
    As far as many of the municipalities around me that do have inspections, with a state electrical license I can submit it to obtain a local regions AHJ registration and fee (if required) to do work in their area. (Ex. Ottawa county, Wood county, Toledo, etc) in order to obtain permits/inspections.



    Quote Originally Posted by jselesk2 View Post
    Hello everyone,

    Hoping to find some Ohioans on here who can give me some advice...

    So, it appears that in order to be able to obtain an electrical permit in 99% of the cities in Ohio, one must be licensed as a commercial electrical contractor with the state, as 99% of the cities require this. It appears that this is the ONLY way to obtain electrical permits in most cities in Ohio. First of all, if anyone has any information citing otherwise, please correct me.

    Now, in order to obtain a state commercial electrical license in Ohio, one must spend 5 years working under a licensed electrical contractor, having completed at least 1 job requiring a permit for each of the 5 years in order to be eligible to apply for the state examination that will award a license upon a passing grade.

    Now I'm going to vent a little bit... I think this setup it total BS. Why should I have to waste 5 years of my life working as an electrician employee performing menial tasks that I already know how to do in order to be able to do residential electrical work? Why in the world isn't there an alternative path set up to allow people who already have the knowledge and skill to be able to work as an independent electrical contractor? To me this seems absurd. Does anyone know of an alternative way?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    33,333
    Quote Originally Posted by jselesk2 View Post
    I was making $13.50 an hour. Why should I have to endure that for years when I am confident in my skills now? I think it's an absurd requirement probably conspired by the state's large electrical contractors to limit competition.
    I hear you but I can only assume that you have been working illegally all these years and now you want the state to accept that you have a firm grasp of the code and have all that experience behind you. In fact you would have to admit you broke the law. For some reason, the state thinks 5 years experience is necessary.

    I have no reason to not believe that you are totally competent and I agree that many workers can be in the field for 20 years and not understand the code or be capable of passing the exam.

    As I see it, you want special treatment for yourself because you know your abilities and are confident. But, you did, if I correct in assuming, break the law and in many states that may prevent you from getting a license.

    Not sure how you can make your case to the board without first changing the rules. I am going to guess that will not happen.

    The issue here is that you may be in the upper 2% of the bell curve and laws can't be made for those few who are gifted, so to speak.

    If you don't work within the system then you will probably have to continue with what you are doing because I am doubtful the board will make an exception.

    Passing the test isn't everything as I have seen guys pass the test with less than a year experience - somehow their boss lied for them terms of hours, but he had no idea of how to run a job. I used to get calls all the time from him. He finally persued another field. I am not saying that is you but this is why the board whats verified field experience, IMO. Imagine going to a guy who passed the MCAP's but had no medical experience. Not the same
    but you get my drift
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •