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Thread: Microwave circuit

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Microwave circuit

    We have been installing dedicated 20 amp circuit to all kitchen remodels, new construction etc, & have been required in multiple jurisdictions to install gfi above the unit in cabinet, & was not able to find code article supporting this code.


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  2. #2
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    IMO, the '17 Code clarified this situation.
    In 210.8(A) GFCI is required for kitchen receptacles that are installed to serve the counter-top surfaces. '17 added wording :when determining the distance from receptacles the distance shall be measured as the shortest path the cord of an appliance connected to the receptacle would follow without piercing a floor, wall, ceiling, or fixed barrier or passing through a door, doorway, or window.
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  3. #3
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    Is there a sink withing 6 feet?

    If so, how to measure wasn't as clear before 2017 as Augie mentioned.

    Otherwise outside being of within six feet of a sink, GFCI is not required for receptacles not serving countetops.
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  4. #4
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    Are you asking about using an individual branch circuit for combo microwave/range hoods?

    422.16(B)(4) Range Hoods. Range hoods shall be permitted to be
    cord-and-plug-connected with a flexible cord identified as suitable for use on range hoods in the installation instructions of the appliance manufacturer, where all of the following conditions are met:
    (1) The flexible cord is terminated with a grounding-type attachment plug.
    Exception: A listed range hood distinctly marked to identify it as protected by a system of double insulation, or its
    equivalent, shall not be required to be terminated with a grounding-type attachment plug.
    (2) The length of the cord is not less than 450 mm (18 in.)
    and not over 900 mm (36 in.).
    (3) Receptacles are located to avoid physical damage to the
    flexible cord.
    (4) The receptacle is accessible.
    (5) The receptacle is supplied by an individual branch
    circuit.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    Are you asking about using an individual branch circuit for combo microwave/range hoods?

    422.16(B)(4) Range Hoods. Range hoods shall be permitted to be
    cord-and-plug-connected with a flexible cord identified as suitable for use on range hoods in the installation instructions of the appliance manufacturer, where all of the following conditions are met:
    (1) The flexible cord is terminated with a grounding-type attachment plug.
    Exception: A listed range hood distinctly marked to identify it as protected by a system of double insulation, or its
    equivalent, shall not be required to be terminated with a grounding-type attachment plug.
    (2) The length of the cord is not less than 450 mm (18 in.)
    and not over 900 mm (36 in.).
    (3) Receptacles are located to avoid physical damage to the
    flexible cord.
    (4) The receptacle is accessible.
    (5) The receptacle is supplied by an individual branch
    circuit.
    That is something to have to think about with many of these, but he seemed to be asking if it needed to be GFCI protected.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  6. #6
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    In a cabinet behind the door GFCI not required.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    In a cabinet behind the door GFCI not required.
    The NEC is a permissible code with minimum standards, which designs can exceed.

    But our AHJ wont allow GFCI reset buttons behind cabinet doors. Not "readily accessible location" per First ¶ 210.8, until a written challenge prevailed for under-sink dishwasher plugs. Per 2014 NEC language, someone refused the Fuse-Box upgrade to accommodate GFCI breakers.

    This senior planner continues to prohibit this practice unless challenged, to force Fuse-Box upgrades during kitchen remodels, and when our State adopts the 2017 NEC language in 210.8, challengers trying to avoid fuse box upgrades will no longer prevail.
    Last edited by ramsy; 04-14-18 at 10:15 PM.
    Roger Ramjet NoFixNoPay

  8. #8
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    We have always installed the receptacle for a permanently mounted microwave either in a cabinet above or to the left or right of the microwave, or in worst case, below the microwave. I do not believe you can mount a GFCI receptacle behind the microwave and still have it considered readily accessible. Virginia is on the 2012 IRC for one and two family residences, which is basically the 2011 NEC with certain modifications, notably in the absence of afci breakers for all but circuits serving bedroom outlets.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ramsy View Post
    The NEC is a permissible code with minimum standards, which designs can exceed.

    But our AHJ wont allow GFCI reset buttons behind cabinet doors. Not "readily accessible location" per First ¶ 210.8, until a written challenge prevailed for under-sink dishwasher plugs. Per 2014 NEC language, someone refused the Fuse-Box upgrade to accommodate GFCI breakers.

    This senior planner continues to prohibit this practice unless challenged, to force Fuse-Box upgrades during kitchen remodels, and when our State adopts the 2017 NEC language in 210.8, challengers trying to avoid fuse box upgrades will no longer prevail.
    AFCI requirements make the fuse box upgrade issue more of a practical thing to do. GFCI doesn't have to be at the breaker. AFCI - kind of does if a new circuit is run, but one can also run it from a "sub panel" even if that new sub only contains just one circuit.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    We have always installed the receptacle for a permanently mounted microwave either in a cabinet above or to the left or right of the microwave, or in worst case, below the microwave. I do not believe you can mount a GFCI receptacle behind the microwave and still have it considered readily accessible. Virginia is on the 2012 IRC for one and two family residences, which is basically the 2011 NEC with certain modifications, notably in the absence of afci breakers for all but circuits serving bedroom outlets.
    Nearly all "fastened in place" microwaves are the range hood combination type units. I have never seen one that doesn't have the cord out the top and is intended to plug into a receptacle in a cabinet above the unit.

    GFCI requirements only got confusing on this one when they change the rules to make all receptacles within 6 feet of a sink required to be GFCI protected. Then 2017 clarified what is considered within six feet of a sink. As long as the cabinet has a door with receptacle inside - they don't intend this receptacle to require GFCI protection even if near a sink.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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