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Thread: L6-30 receptacle, 1gang or 2gang box?

  1. #1
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    L6-30 receptacle, 1gang or 2gang box?

    I have to run a circuit tomorrow for a L6-30 Recep.
    I don't yet have the Recep in hand.
    Trying to remember. it'll fit in a 1gang box won't it?

    I have to cut in a remodel box tomorrow and fish the wire. Won't get the Recep until Wednesday.

    Thanks!

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    It's 1 gang but not sure about your remodel box cu in ..

    At my age, I'm accustomed to restaurants asking me to pay in advance, but now my bank has started sending me their calendar one month at a time.

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    Thanks!
    I'll keep box fill in mind when doing it.

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    4" sq. deep box with a single-gang mud ring will make your life much easier. It may fit in a smaller box, but you'll hate doing it, especially if you are using solid conductors.


    SceneryDriver

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    Standard old-work boxes come in extra-deep size, allowing for plenty of room for #10 wires, and that receptacle is no larger than a typical duplex.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

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    If this is going in drywall you have to make sure the box & wall are sturdy enough. When you push in with the plug then twist to lock it, you can either push the box in or crack the drywall. You can even damage the wall putting in the box with the stiffer 10-2 cable.
    Cutting in the box as tight as you can to the wall will help some.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

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    Try to make sure you hit alongside a stud and use one of Arlington's "One box"es. They have a lot of cubic inches and as mentioned about physical strains on plugging and twisting - it at least is attached to framing member.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Try to make sure you hit alongside a stud and use one of Arlington's "One box"es. They have a lot of cubic inches and as mentioned about physical strains on plugging and twisting - it at least is attached to framing member.
    +1. Those Arlington boxes come with bosses on the side made for screws to go into a stud. aside from the strain of pushing 10 Slash 2 into the box, or the Locking plug into the receptacle, you may also have to worry about somebody tripping over a cord and yanking the box out of the wall. I would not use a standard cut in box for a locking receptacle, no matter what the wall type is
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

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    I have used a standard depth "cut in" remodel box with an L6-30 before. The receptacle brand I used (Bryant or Leviton) had no terminals in the center of the device so the box clamp screws in the middle of the box face were OK. Feed was 1/2 flex 3x #10 into box top.Tight but worked out OK. This was in a rack room with a right angle plug and cable going down under an access floor. So no chance of tripping and pulling out the box as noted above in this installation.

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    Homeline 230 gfci breaker

    I got the circuit run. Used a retro box that has the internal screws, was able cut-in next to a stud. I feel confident in the stability of the box and receptacle.

    It's a dedicated circuit for a kitchen appliance. Once they plug in their appliance it won't be regularly plugged/unplugged.

    My next issue is getting a Homeline 230 gfci breaker for this circuit since its in a commercial kitchen. The supply house informed me that since I'm not a member of their Sq D buying program the breaker costs is $191 + shipping! I told them I could buy a similar breaker in 60 amp at the box store for ~ $80! (I'm sure it's cheaper because of economies of scales associated with hot tubs)

    I ended up ordering through Amazon for ~$100...

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