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Thread: Exposed Energized Conductor or Circuit Part - OSHA vs NFPA70E

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    AHJ call?
    You realize topic is about safe work practices and how to determine when a certain condition exists and not so much about install procedures?
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    You realize topic is about safe work practices and how to determine when a certain condition exists and not so much about install procedures?
    I realise, but there might be safe work practices in install procedures also.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    I realise, but there might be safe work practices in install procedures also.
    AHJ is typical term for whoever approves installation. They don't ordinarily get involved in work practice safety procedures, they are checking code compliance on the installation.

    Safety procedures are a little more driven by company policy - with outside influence by insurance companies, OSHA, etc. to encourage using an already recognized publication such as 70E as your safety policy for tasks involving electrical hazards.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  4. #14
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    Kwired:

    Perhaps our interaction clarified OP: An open, insulated, energized, outdoor conductor is exposed (per OSHA) and an open, insulated, energized, indoor conductor is not exposed (per NFPA 70E).

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    Kwired:

    Perhaps our interaction clarified OP: An open, insulated, energized, outdoor conductor is exposed (per OSHA) and an open, insulated, energized, indoor conductor is not exposed (per NFPA 70E).
    I give up. OSHA (kind of) wants us to follow 70E, yet they contradict it with what you just mentioned
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  6. #16
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    The safety lesson here is, do not touch an open, energized, outdoor conductor, even though it is insulated, because it is exposed per OSHA.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    The safety lesson here is, do not touch an open, energized, outdoor conductor, even though it is insulated, because it is exposed per OSHA.
    ...when you're working on power generation, transmission or distribution, yes.

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