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Thread: "Edison" style bulbs and PAR bulbs

  1. #1
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    "Edison" style bulbs and PAR bulbs

    I know it is a stupid question, but I really wanna figure this out. The thing is that I have met someone want to buy bulbs, he want "Edison" style bulbs (traditional bulbs), not PAR bulbs. So what's the difference between Edison style bulbs and PAR bulbs? I guess all "Edison" style bulbs are transparent, able to see the fuse clearly. Am I right? If my expression is unclear, please indicate.
    Last edited by rbalex; 05-03-18 at 09:12 AM. Reason: Removed signature advertising

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by syhdeejey View Post
    I know it is a stupid question, but I really wanna figure this out. The thing is that I have met someone want to buy bulbs, he want "Edison" style bulbs (traditional bulbs), not PAR bulbs. So what's the difference between Edison style bulbs and PAR bulbs? I guess all "Edison" style bulbs are transparent, able to see the fuse clearly. Am I right? If my expression is unclear, please indicate.
    To me Edison style bulbs are what are formally designated as Type A, roughly spherical with a cylindrical neck and screw base. Traditionally seen in table and floor lamps with shades and in fixtures that either expose the whole bulb or have a crude reflector behind the bulb.

    PAR, on the other hand, are roughly conical, with a rounded or flat face as the based of the cone and a very good reflective surface on the cone portion.
    More specifically PAR stands for Parabolic Aluminized Reflector. The parabolic part means that the reflector will take all light rays striking it from a filament located at the focal point and send them out directly along the axis of the bulb.

    In a recessed fixture an A type bulb will loose much of its light output to the collar on the inside of the fixture and will give a very wide light distribution. A PAR bulb will send most of its light directly out of the fixture at an angle which will depend on the nominal angle of the bulb, ranging from spot through narrow flood to wide flood.

    In newer lighting design terminology an "antique" Edison bulb is clear with a long visible reddish-yellow filament, looking like the carbon filament in the earliest bulbs invented by Thomas Edison. Other type A bulbs may be frosted or otherwise hide the filament to give a softer light distribution. And give a much whiter light.

    You need to find out which meaning of the term your customer is using.

  3. #3
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    Welcome to The Forum. To me, Edison is a type of base (medium), not a style of lightbulb. in the context you presented though, I would assume the customer wants 'round bulbs', not floodlights or directional.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by syhdeejey View Post
    I know it is a stupid question, but I really wanna figure this out. The thing is that I have met someone want to buy bulbs, he want "Edison" style bulbs (traditional bulbs), not PAR bulbs. So what's the difference between Edison style bulbs and PAR bulbs? I guess all "Edison" style bulbs are transparent, able to see the fuse clearly. Am I right? If my expression is unclear, please indicate.
    Does he want to run them with DC too ?
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  5. #5
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    Well, it gets a little more complicated than that. Have a look here for everything you need to know. http://www.ledwatcher.com/light-bulb...pes-explained/

    -Hal

  6. #6
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    And there are some very nice Edison style LED lamps available
    Moderator-Washington State
    Ancora Imparo

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    Well, it gets a little more complicated than that. Have a look here for everything you need to know. http://www.ledwatcher.com/light-bulb...pes-explained/

    -Hal
    Hal, you ole rabble rouser! "Edison" is only mentioned once in your referenced link.

    Personally, I have come to use "Edison" only in reference to the type of base. In your linked reference that is the E26 screw shell.
    Last edited by al hildenbrand; 05-03-18 at 03:41 PM.
    Another Al in Minnesota

  8. #8
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    Thanks, gentlemen. Actually, he is not my customer. I saw his question and I'm curious about the difference between "Edison" style bulbs and PAR bulbs. I marked the article and will read it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by syhdeejey View Post
    Thanks, gentlemen. Actually, he is not my customer. I saw his question and I'm curious about the difference between "Edison" style bulbs and PAR bulbs. I marked the article and will read it.
    Edison is typically referring to the base type not the lamp type.

    There are many lamp types that use an Edison base - including some PAR type lamps.

    There is even Edison base plug fuses that use the same base as Edison base lamps.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    There is even Edison base plug fuses that use the same base as Edison base lamps.
    Very handy for troubleshooting short circuits.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

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