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Thread: Energizing on Set Time Schedule

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
    Posts
    3,567
    Although the answers to my previous posts were good and interesting, the issue I wanted to address is the identification of any recognized standard that prohibits the energization of field equipment based on a set time schedule.
    Not per se. I think the requirements for LOTO and using grounding jumpers would apply.

    -Hal

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    5,707
    Quote Originally Posted by TVH View Post
    I failed to mention in the original post that locks and tags were removed from the prime energy source by supervision prior to the initial energization of the new field transformer. The lone worker at the transformer did not have a lock applied to the energy source. Part of the energization procedure, at that time, allowed energization based on a set time schedule. The procedure which was approved by management, had been in place for several projects without incident. The lone worker had not completed all his work and it was speculated that he did not have the proper time. It is obvious that the procedure was seriously flawed and it was subsequently revised requiring radio or portable telephone communications at the equipment being energized before the switch was pulled at the substation. Other safeguards were also added to the procedure.

    Although the answers to my previous posts were good and interesting, the issue I wanted to address is the identification of any recognized standard that prohibits the energization of field equipment based on a set time schedule. I cannot locate a reference on this subject. Can anyone help identify a mandatory standard/reference on this subject. I believe the subject needs highlighting to operatives responsible for the electrical energization of field positioned equipment.
    Thank you for your assistance and cooperation.
    OSHA includes a "general duty" clause that basically is a catch-all, requiring:

    (a) Each employer --

    (1) shall furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees;


    Anyone familiar with this type of work could have easily foreseen this tragedy.

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