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Thread: Scissor Lift Static Shock

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Arcata, CA
    Posts
    402
    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post

    As to why it happens with some lifts and not others, who knows... Probably a difference in Tire Construction. Or some lifts may already have devices on them to dissipate any static buildup.
    Maybe some of them are like ours, with plentiful screws embedded in the tires to drain off any charge as it is driven.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Greenville SC
    Posts
    726
    Several of my customers hang a foot or so of ordinary chain from the rear of fork lifts to dissipate static charges.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Eastern Oregon
    Posts
    3,534
    Hanging a chain would be good, we usually hang a piece of #4 bare Cu because we have it in the shop...

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    94
    To answer a couple of questions: the surface is concrete with those small pebbles that are sealed on the top. I get shocked wherever I touch structural metal not the lift itself. Whatever part of my body touches gets shocked.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    37,107
    Quote Originally Posted by 2Broke2Sleep View Post
    To answer a couple of questions: the surface is concrete with those small pebbles that are sealed on the top. I get shocked wherever I touch structural metal not the lift itself. Whatever part of my body touches gets shocked.
    I assume that means when you are on the lift and touch structural metal. You are at the same potential as the lift - structural metal is at ground potential. You likely get similar shock if you were on something well grounded and touched the lift.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    5,438
    Quote Originally Posted by 2Broke2Sleep View Post
    To answer a couple of questions: the surface is concrete with those small pebbles that are sealed on the top. I get shocked wherever I touch structural metal not the lift itself. Whatever part of my body touches gets shocked.
    Then you and the lift are at a higher potential then the structural metal that you are eventually touching. The lift as it rolls across the ground, for whatever reason, is building up a static charge, which you are equalizing when you touch an uncharged piece of metal. These charges can easily exceed 10000 volts, although extremely low amperage. Nevertheless, getting popped by what has essentially become a stun gun is unpleasant.

    Myself, I would engineer something on the fly to fix this problem, probably a piece of quarter inch all thread with numerous wraps of electrical tape around the middle to grab, then touch it to the lift and the structural steel. $0.10 worth electrical tape and a trash piece of all thread left in the lift bucket or platform will fix this problem. Then you're not spending money fixing rental lifts
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Springfield, MA, USA
    Posts
    3,158
    It is also quite likely that the static discharge current is not enough to be a problem in this case. If it were, you would feel it in more than the hand touching the structure. Instead the problem is the small arc.

    Post #7 mentions this; guide the discharge through some bit of metal that you are in solid contact with. The current flows through your body but the arc hits the metal. Just grab a metal tool, hold it firmly, and touch the metal to the structure.

    If the charge is really big, you might feel it in your feet, however.

    -Jon

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2
    Most scissor lifts come with a rubber grounding strap, normally attached at the rear center. Whenever I get a static shock in a lift, I always find that the strap is missing. I bet the lifts that don't zap you have the straps intact.

    The solution is simple, replace the missing strap, or use a wire or chain as everyone is suggesting.

    Sent from mTalk

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Posts
    2,640
    Quote Originally Posted by Jolted View Post
    Most scissor lifts come with a rubber grounding strap, normally attached at the rear center. Whenever I get a static shock in a lift, I always find that the strap is missing. I bet the lifts that don't zap you have the straps intact.

    The solution is simple, replace the missing strap, or use a wire or chain as everyone is suggesting.

    Sent from mTalk
    I would agree. I'm surprised this is an issue in Florida though, as moist as the air is there. In my neck of the woods, Sam's Club used to have static drain wires on all the shopping carts. My store got so bad at one time that I would not use any cart that the wire was missing. I haven't noticed them lately-maybe they just corrected the humidity level in the store.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    37,107
    Quote Originally Posted by texie View Post
    I would agree. I'm surprised this is an issue in Florida though, as moist as the air is there. In my neck of the woods, Sam's Club used to have static drain wires on all the shopping carts. My store got so bad at one time that I would not use any cart that the wire was missing. I haven't noticed them lately-maybe they just corrected the humidity level in the store.
    or have carts with higher conductive wheels.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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