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Thread: Scissor Lift Static Shock

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    Scissor Lift Static Shock

    Does anyone know why some scissor lifts our company rents give everyone a good static shock after we drive them any distance? Is there something not hooked up somewhere that is supposed to be? If anyone knows can you PLEASE tell me. We rent these for months at a time and I'd rather not get shocked for that long!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2Broke2Sleep View Post
    Does anyone know why some scissor lifts our company rents give everyone a good static shock after we drive them any distance? Is there something not hooked up somewhere that is supposed to be? If anyone knows can you PLEASE tell me. We rent these for months at a time and I'd rather not get shocked for that long!
    same reason you get static shock anywhere. movement thru dry air creates static on the surface of the metal. there is no real good answer to this.
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    same reason you get static shock anywhere. movement thru dry air creates static on the surface of the metal. there is no real good answer to this.
    Rubber tires on carpeted surface will build up a static charge. A piece of bare #12 copper wire attached to the lift's frame and trailing on the floor may be enough to dissipate the charge, maybe not.


    SceneryDriver

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    If I clamp a peice of wire to the metal frame can I discharge the static with that wire instead of my body?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2Broke2Sleep View Post
    If I clamp a peice of wire to the metal frame can I discharge the static with that wire instead of my body?
    That would probably work. How much of a charge are we talking about here? Is it anything more than annoying?


    SceneryDriver

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    Quote Originally Posted by SceneryDriver View Post
    That would probably work. How much of a charge are we talking about here? Is it anything more than annoying?


    SceneryDriver
    It's actually painful. Makes me curse every time!

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    Automobile tires are conductive, to drain away the static charge on the chassis before refueling. (otherwise, the static charge would be discharged between the fuel nozzle and the fuel tank neck -- not a great place for a spark) Apparently, the lift tires aren't.

    A piece of copper wire probably won't make very good contact or last very long. Rubber anti-static strips -- common in the 1950s and 1960s -- still exist.
    https://www.bellautomotive.com/Anti-...-1-00108-3.htm
    (while perusing random images on the Internet, I began wondering how many of these are attached to non-metallic vehicle fascias)

    Name:  vehicle-ground-strap.jpg
Views: 409
Size:  13.4 KB

    If you anticipate it, you can drain the static charge through a wedding ring, metal watchband or piece of metal held firmly in your hand. If the spark doesn't jump to your skin, the pain will be greatly reduced.

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    Where do you feel the shock? In your hands when you climb off the lift, or in your hands when you touch building structure after you move? Or do you feel it in your feet?

    What sort of surface are you driving the lift around on?

    -Jon

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    Bolt or clamp a metal curb feeler from the frame of the lift to the ground. Static won't build up as much that way if the charge can be dissipated back to ground. If you can't do this for whatever reason, touch the lift with the back of your hand instead of your fingertips, it is a lot less startling that way... Less nerve endings on the back of your hand than on your fingertips.

    as to why it happens with some lifts and not others, who knows... Probably a difference in Tire Construction. Or some lifts may already have devices on them to dissipate any static buildup.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

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    I don't remember ever getting a static shock from a scissor lift. Kind of wonder what type of surface they are driving the lifts on.
    The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

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