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Thread: Defrost timer mounted inside walk-in freezer?

  1. #1
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    Defrost timer mounted inside walk-in freezer?

    Do you see/have problems with the idea of mounting the time clock in the freezer?

    This walk-in is located outside and is detached from the building by about 3 feet.

    It would greatly simplify the installation if there wasn't a problem with doing this.

    Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by sw_ross View Post
    Do you see/have problems with the idea of mounting the time clock in the freezer?

    This walk-in is located outside and is detached from the building by about 3 feet.

    It would greatly simplify the installation if there wasn't a problem with doing this.

    Thanks!
    Will the timer work at freezer temperatures? Our domestic freezer runs at -25C which is about -13F. Not sure how or if electrical/electronic components would survive that.
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

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    Electric components will be fine. Lubricants on mechanical components is what may have issues in low temp extremes.

    That said timer motor will generate some heat, and will be a little warmer inside the enclosure then it is outside. That alone should help prevent condensation within that enclosure.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Electric components will be fine. Lubricants on mechanical components is what may have issues in low temp extremes.

    That said timer motor will generate some heat, and will be a little warmer inside the enclosure then it is outside. That alone should help prevent condensation within that enclosure.
    Thanks for the help!

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Electric components will be fine. Lubricants on mechanical components is what may have issues in low temp extremes.
    The timers we commonly use are specified as -10C to +50C.
    The OP needs to check the spec on his.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    The timers we commonly use are specified as -10C to +50C.
    The OP needs to check the spec on his.
    I agree. The ones he was talking about in another thread likely are designed to be used in similar temp extremes.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    It's a Paragon, model # 8145-20.

    I'll look at it closer when I get to the job today regarding any temp limitations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sw_ross View Post
    Do you see/have problems with the idea of mounting the time clock in the freezer?

    This walk-in is located outside and is detached from the building by about 3 feet.

    It would greatly simplify the installation if there wasn't a problem with doing this.

    Thanks!
    Its better practice not to do so because things can often get very wet inside walk in freezers under various operating conditions in temperate zones, and with varying quality of moisture sealing practices.Also, its better not to have that clock where non-professionals can lay hands on it, again with it being potentially quite wet.
    Most modern condensing units are set up to have the timer mounted inside the cabinet. This means one control conduit run from the CU to the Evaporator which you should need in most cases anyway with 240V electric defrost systems.
    Microwave Radiation Dangers should be openly discussed

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    ... timer motor will generate some heat, and will be a little warmer inside the enclosure then it is outside. That alone should help prevent condensation within that enclosure.
    "Some": 5 watts, maybe, which won't be nearly enough to prevent condensation, nor to keep the mechanical parts up to -10°C. (if applicable)

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    If you can mount it on the roof of the cold box that is what I would do. Make a unistrut brace for it out of 2 pieces of strut and a 90 degree strut connector. Bolt one leg of the strut angle to the roof of the box and let the other end stand straight up. Support the timer off of that. Run liquid tite down into the box to the fan coil.
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