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Thread: Bumper Boat Power for Chargers

  1. #1
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    Bumper Boat Power for Chargers

    If any of you have some experience with providing power for bumper boats at a day camp or water park facility I would appreciate your input. While filing a permit I submitted a single line diagram along with some photos from a nearby day camp facility that recently installed power for bumper boat chargers. The following (3) photos are from that facility





    This shows low voltage wiring (25 VDC) going out to the boats. Extensions for the power cords were made from 12 ga. landscape wire. Each boat has a built-in battery and 13' cord. Each charger has a 10' LV power cord. In this particular case extensions had to be made up.



    This is the set-up for 120V power to each charger. Each one draws 9 amps so they are on individual 120V circuits.
    My local EI says that he doesn't understand how this installation ever passed inspection and I should read through Article 682. His concern is that the connectors for the boats are laying on the deck and subject to weather conditions and a possible shock hazard.



    This is a photo of an installation at a water park facility. You can't see the connectors but I'm sure they are exposed. I don't see a problem as long as they are in a restricted area.



    The back side of this deck is the area that I plan to install the power and the chargers. It's 16' from the near edge of the dock. I don't see any potential problems. This will be a restricted area and no boats will be charged while there are any boaters in the water. For the most part, boats will be charged overnight.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    So to plug into the charger you have the cord going over the fence and across the walkway? As an inspector I would not like that. Can you not mount something at the far edge of the fence that is near the water?
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    So to plug into the charger you have the cord going over the fence and across the walkway? As an inspector I would not like that. Can you not mount something at the far edge of the fence that is near the water?
    That fence is going to be relocated far back so that no Only authorized people have access to that area . Cords will not be going over or through the fence

  4. #4
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    This is very interesting, but completely new to me. Sorry, if these questions are basic.
    At less than 50 volts, how much of chapters 1 thru 4 apply?
    Are the chargers and downstream circuits covered by Article 720 (p. 70-672) and table 11(B) (p. 70-770)?
    Is there a class in the charger's listing, like "Class 3"?
    At 9 amps and 120 volts is the charger supplying over 40 amps at 25 volts?
    Half of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class.

  5. #5
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    Breaker panel picture, code violations?

    Either the main breaker isn't labeled, or there's more than six throws of the hand.

    The exposed green insulated wire:
    If it's just used as the bond to the equipotential plane (682.33), it's probably fine.
    If it's the GEC or doing double duty as GEC and bond, it fails 250.64(B).
    If there is no GEC, this panel, for this seperate structure, fails 250.32.
    Last edited by Glennsparky; 05-20-18 at 11:13 AM.
    Half of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class.

  6. #6
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    More panel fails.

    110.26 working space.

    No in use covers, grandfathered?
    Half of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    So to plug into the charger you have the cord going over the fence and across the walkway? As an inspector I would not like that. Can you not mount something at the far edge of the fence that is near the water?
    what the inspector likes or does not like is not relevant. it is whether it meets code or not.

    it might be a hazard of some sort other than a code violation though, but I don't see how the electrical inspector would have any say in that.

    how is this any different than anything else you might have to plug in to recharge? other than the water element which admittedly does introduce some additional issues. I would say it is no different than plugging a boat into get shore power and should probably be handled similarly since the bumper boats are actual boats.
    Bob

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    what the inspector likes or does not like is not relevant. it is whether it meets code or not.

    it might be a hazard of some sort other than a code violation though, but I don't see how the electrical inspector would have any say in that.
    720.11 (or 110.12) neat and workmanlike manner. It's a stretch for me to say that the electrician is responsible for the charger's cords. But, obvious trip and other hazards can result from the electrician's choices. Considering teenage employees, a trip hazard and that an unconscious person can drown in two inches of water, an inspector can be confident his decision to fail it won't be overturned.
    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    I would say it is no different than plugging a boat into get shore power and should probably be handled similarly since the bumper boats are actual boats.
    That would be a very good looking install and i'm all for it. I'm glad you said "similarly", because shore power is very expensive in both parts and labor. So, the spirit of a shore power install with the price tag of a 25 volt sized danger. imho
    Last edited by Glennsparky; 05-20-18 at 01:53 PM.
    Half of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    what the inspector likes or does not like is not relevant. it is whether it meets code or not.

    it might be a hazard of some sort other than a code violation though, but I don't see how the electrical inspector would have any say in that.

    how is this any different than anything else you might have to plug in to recharge? other than the water element which admittedly does introduce some additional issues. I would say it is no different than plugging a boat into get shore power and should probably be handled similarly since the bumper boats are actual boats.
    Wouldn't those cords be considered 'subject to physical damage' being on a walkway? Limited access or not, they are likely to be stepped on.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    Wouldn't those cords be considered 'subject to physical damage' being on a walkway? Limited access or not, they are likely to be stepped on.
    Some cords are made to be stepped on. That's their listing. Just like the definition of rigid metal conduit includes " ... designed for the physical protection ...". "Subject to physical damage" is not an issue. It's their purpose.

    Second, where in the code does the phrase "subject to physical damage" apply to a 25 volt cord? This is a safety code after all and a damaged 25 volt cord poses little or no safety hazard. This is why every chapter and article starts with "scope". If a situation is not included in the scope of a chapter or article then nothing that chapter or article says applies to that situation.
    Half of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class.

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