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Thread: outlet height

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyjwc View Post
    The plans are wrong 90% of the time, because too many engineers use cut and paste and don't ever change their plans. When you have to raise a 100 or so outlets, because you did not check to see if they were right or not, you'll wish you had asked first.
    Then it should fail plans review, right?

    If there is no plans review then yes it is mostly the installer that is responsible.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyjwc View Post
    The plans are wrong 90% of the time, because too many engineers use cut and paste and don't ever change their plans. When you have to raise a 100 or so outlets, because you did not check to see if they were right or not, you'll wish you had asked first.
    I have had to rebox entire buildings more than one time because of box height errors. Only slightly less fun is changing around mud rings because the wall detail was missed or changed.

    One of the first jobs I worked on, the cabinet guys set their cabinets on top of carpet and tile that should not have been there. Rather than rip all of the glued in Granite backsplashes out and what not, the electrician had to move his receptacles up to clear the backsplashes. Sometimes even when you're right, you are wrong
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    I have had to rebox entire buildings more than one time because of box height errors. Only slightly less fun is changing around mud rings because the wall detail was missed or changed.

    One of the first jobs I worked on, the cabinet guys set their cabinets on top of carpet and tile that should not have been there. Rather than rip all of the glued in Granite backsplashes out and what not, the electrician had to move his receptacles up to clear the backsplashes. Sometimes even when you're right, you are wrong
    Sounds like you, or your boss, didn't give high enough price to move them compared to what cabinet/counter guys gave for a price. Or your firm only slightly underpriced them and possibly made a killing on the change.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyjwc View Post
    The plans are wrong 90% of the time, because too many engineers use cut and paste and don't ever change their plans. When you have to raise a 100 or so outlets, because you did not check to see if they were right or not, you'll wish you had asked first.

    I agree with John on this one. Never blindly follow prints, if you see anything that doesn't seem right then you should question it.

    Most electricians should know what the ADA requirements are for their areas from doing other jobs. So you will know there is a good chance the plans are wrong.
    The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Sounds like you, or your boss, didn't give high enough price to move them compared to what cabinet/counter guys gave for a price. Or your firm only slightly underpriced them and possibly made a killing on the change.
    The job with the backsplashes, we were doing the low voltage on that job... We didn't have to change anything. Other jobs were we had to change all of our boxes in a building, my illustrious former boss was responsible for the initial screw up. I believe reboxing an entire building was more aggravating than not getting paid on time
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    I agree with the above posters, typically specifications are x amount of inches to the center line of the box, above finished floor (AFF). Finished floor includes things like concrete pours, carpet padding, carpet, tile, etcetera.

    I have done some hotels were there is maybe a 6 inch gap in the wall above the desk backsplash to the bottom of the picture frame or mirror above it.
    The data boxes that were supposed to go in that area have to be mounted at a pretty precise location.

    Kitchens can also have very small ranges of acceptable receptacle height... Too low, and it's in the backsplash, too high, and it's in the cabinet.

    If in doubt at all, get an RFI.
    Which also adds one other layer of minute attention to detail, because usually counter with millwork are built from the unfinished floor so be careful.


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