Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Your suggestions for client QA questions?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Tampa, FL, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Your suggestions for client QA questions?

    I would like to call each client and ask them how well my employees are performing on service calls. (I only have one full-timer right now, but I'm hopeful about growing.) I'm thinking about tying the score to a bonus program to encourage excellent performance. My goal is to make the client so happy that they are excited to recommend us to friends and neighbors.

    I'm looking for the smallest set of questions to ask that provide the most information. I'm thinking a maximum of three questions would be about right, but I suppose followup questions might be in order. What do you people suggest?

    Possible Questions:

    Did Sam arrive on time?

    Did Sam leave the work area clean?

    Did Sam provide you with excellent service?

    Were you thrilled with the service you received today?

    Was there anything we could have done better?

    Was the price too low, too high, or about right?

    -------------

    I was thinking I would not ask "Would you recommend us?" since people probably would not answer honestly to avoid confrontation.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Fl
    Posts
    17,138
    You'd be better off giving the customer a questionnaire with the bill. If I was called by a service provider asking about an employees performance and arrival times I'd be inclined to think the provider was checking up on a problem child.

    Roger
    Moderator

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    5,438
    Just my two cents... I would not ask the customer if my employee arrived on time or left the work area clean. Questions 3 and 4 are leading/loaded. Question 5 is the only one I'd ask.

    Question 6, do you really think anyone's going to tell you 'no you didn't charge me enough'? And if the price was honestly too high, then someone else would be doing the work and not you, correct?

    Eta: even question 5 maybe better asked as a broader "Do you have any suggestions for us".

    You have to keep in mind that 5 drastically different customers may have very different ideas of what constitutes a good job. The professional type will be happy that you showed up on time, got everything working, and left without leaving a mess. Whereas say little old lady type maybe more taken with the fact that her dog liked you and you talked about her flowers with her for 10 minutes than any work you did. Others are not going to give one hoot about you or anything you do, you are simply there to fix a problem or put in something they want.
    Last edited by JFletcher; 05-24-18 at 08:11 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    5,728
    Quote Originally Posted by Coppersmith View Post
    I would like to call each client and ask them how well my employees are performing on service calls. (I only have one full-timer right now, but I'm hopeful about growing.) I'm thinking about tying the score to a bonus program to encourage excellent performance. My goal is to make the client so happy that they are excited to recommend us to friends and neighbors.

    I'm looking for the smallest set of questions to ask that provide the most information. I'm thinking a maximum of three questions would be about right, but I suppose followup questions might be in order. What do you people suggest?

    Possible Questions:

    Did Sam arrive on time?

    Did Sam leave the work area clean?

    Did Sam provide you with excellent service?

    Were you thrilled with the service you received today?

    Was there anything we could have done better?

    Was the price too low, too high, or about right?

    -------------

    I was thinking I would not ask "Would you recommend us?" since people probably would not answer honestly to avoid confrontation.
    Most important, "Did Sam fix your problem?", which is not necessarily the same as excellent service.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Northern illinois
    Posts
    16,702
    I think I would limit it to maybe 5 yes or no type questions and a 6th for general comments.

    yes/no type questions

    Did the employee arrive within 15 minutes of the promised time?

    Did the employee answer any question you had in an understandable way?

    Was the employee polite and respectful?

    Did the employee clean up after himself before leaving?

    You get the idea. Simple questions the customer can actually answer. Don't ask about the quality of the work or whether it was done right because the customer has no way to know that.

    Comments.

    Please explain any "no" answers.

    I would not have the employee solicit the forms. Send the customer a later with a postage paid postcard they can fill out and mail back.
    Bob

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Arcata, CA
    Posts
    395
    I would simply ask the customer "are you satisfied with the work?"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    11,380
    Quote Originally Posted by Coppersmith View Post
    I would like to call each client and ask them how well my employees are performing on service calls. (I only have one full-timer right now, but I'm hopeful about growing.) I'm thinking about tying the score to a bonus program to encourage excellent performance. My goal is to make the client so happy that they are excited to recommend us to friends and neighbors.

    I'm looking for the smallest set of questions to ask that provide the most information. I'm thinking a maximum of three questions would be about right, but I suppose followup questions might be in order. What do you people suggest?

    Possible Questions:

    Did Sam arrive on time?

    Did Sam leave the work area clean?

    Did Sam provide you with excellent service?

    Were you thrilled with the service you received today?

    Was there anything we could have done better?

    Was the price too low, too high, or about right?

    -------------

    I was thinking I would not ask "Would you recommend us?" since people probably would not answer honestly to avoid confrontation.
    I'm not sure about the merits of this. I can understand the desire to get feedback. Maybe a phone call or a polite email thanking the customer for their business. If positive, ask if he may be cited as a reference without giving out personal details
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    5,728
    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    I'm not sure about the merits of this. I can understand the desire to get feedback. Maybe a phone call or a polite email thanking the customer for their business. If positive, ask if he may be cited as a reference without giving out personal details
    My last company would send out questionnaires to all it's customers once a year to get feedback on our customer service. Of course we were largely a service company and most of our income was from inspection and testing, so customer retention was a high priority.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Valdosta, GA
    Posts
    4,014

    Your suggestions for client QA questions?

    Generally we only ask if they are satisfied, and if they have any feedback they’d like to give.

    If the tech was late, and it’s an issue, they’ll let you know. We use the ExakTime jobclock system to see when and where someone was.

    Make sure you’re passing along all the positive reviews along with any negative. I always liked hearing that people were happy with me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Brought to you by Carl's Jr.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    5,484
    I would make it casual, not specific
    'just following up to make sure you are happy with our work'
    'any loose ends or things we could do better or different to improve'
    let them do the talking
    The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •