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Thread: Ram promaster 1500

  1. #1
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    Ram promaster 1500

    Anybody have 1 of these vans. We generally run 3/4 ton vans because the stuff we carry ususally squats the 1/2 tons to much. Wondering if these are any different?

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    Regardless what the vehicle is, if it "squats" too much, you likely are at least pushing or even exceeding it's load rating.

    Ever pull one that squats too much on a scale to see where you are at with it?
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    I have vowed to never buy a van less than a 1 ton ever again. I've replaced three transmissions in my 3/4 and 1/2 ton vans/trucks in the last 2 years. I drive the vehicles with the overdrive off to help save the transmission, but it costs me in fuel. My next vehicle if new will be a Nissan NV3500 high roof. It has a 5 year/100K warranty and it's less expensive than the other brands. Electrical service vans just carry too much heavy stuff.

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    It seems to me that a lot of weight in vans is unnecessary. Steel shelving that falls apart anyway, carrying around EMT fittings and sticks of EMT when you might use it once a year in a residential setting, using heavy duty 375 lb rated ladders when neither one of you weigh more than 175, and so on. The extra maintenance that you have to do on them from carrying around several extra hundreds or thousand pounds of unnecessary weight is just ridiculous. Yeah it seems to me that most people would rather have a large fan with high maintenance cost rather than something smaller and having to organize or pair down tool selection, even though the smaller fan probably do 70% of their service work. If you have to haul a bunch of stuff to the job site, get a trailer.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    It seems to me that a lot of weight in vans is unnecessary. Steel shelving that falls apart anyway, carrying around EMT fittings and sticks of EMT when you might use it once a year in a residential setting, using heavy duty 375 lb rated ladders when neither one of you weigh more than 175, and so on. The extra maintenance that you have to do on them from carrying around several extra hundreds or thousand pounds of unnecessary weight is just ridiculous. Yeah it seems to me that most people would rather have a large fan with high maintenance cost rather than something smaller and having to organize or pair down tool selection, even though the smaller fan probably do 70% of their service work. If you have to haul a bunch of stuff to the job site, get a trailer.
    I tried wood shelving, it sagged under the weight it was holding. If you make the wood supports thicker, it takes up too much space. I've tried light weight steel shelving, also sagged. Now I use heavy duty steel wire shelving like they have in kitchen storage. Works good.

    I frequently use EMT in residential settings. Usually it's for outside in a lanai (patio) or garage surface-mount work, but just yesterday we had to install a circuit that ran through a huge home theater with a drop ceiling.

    I'm not sure where you are finding these light weight electricians. I'm 200 and most guys are heavier than me. I use 300 lb ladders.

    A trailer seems like a great idea until you have to do work at a house with a driveway off a major road that is about one car long. There are lots of them around here. No place to park.

    I have pared down what I carry. I used to carry all size fitting up to 2". Now I carry 1/2", 3/4", and a select few larger items. I used to carry at least one stick of PVC up to 2", Now I carry just 3/4" and a few scrap pieces of other sizes.

    I do carry more power tools than is absolutely necessary, but I like speeding up the job with things like a macho-hammer to install ground rods.
    Last edited by Coppersmith; 05-27-18 at 11:54 AM.

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    The idea is so that you won't have to worry about having the needed material or tool. You just get in the truck and go without even looking at the work order. But it comes to a point where hauling around everything you own gets ridiculous. Wear and tear on the truck, gas mileage, etc.

    After owning many Ford F250 vans that went through rears and transmissions, buddy of mine bought a Dodge half-ton van that has front wheel drive. He complains that it is terrible in the snow. Maybe that's because he has so much stuff in the back that the front wheels barely touch the road?

    -Hal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coppersmith View Post
    I tried wood shelving, it sagged under the weight it was holding. If you make the wood supports thicker, it takes up too much space. I've tried light weight steel shelving, also sagged. Now I use heavy duty steel wire shelving like they have in kitchen storage. Works good.

    I frequently use EMT in residential settings. Usually it's for outside in a lanai (patio) or garage surface-mount work, but just yesterday we had to install a circuit that ran through a huge home theater with a drop ceiling.

    I'm not sure where you are finding these light weight electricians. I'm 200 and most guys are heavier than me. I use 300 lb ladders.

    A trailer seems like a great idea until you have to do work at a house with a driveway off a major road that is about one car long. There are lots of them around here. No place to park.

    I have pared down what I carry. I used to carry all size fitting up to 2". Now I carry 1/2", 3/4", and a select few larger items. I used to carry at least one stick of PVC up to 2", Now I carry just 3/4" and a few scrap pieces of other sizes.
    That still is dependent on why you are there. Service calls and one afternoon installations might not warrant the trailer. Total renovation, you might be parking that trailer in the yard(if necessary) for a few days, or even getting permission to park it somewhere nearby but on other property.

    If there is space to unload tools/equipment at the site maybe you only bring trailer first day to unload, and sometime near the end of project to load items no longer needed. Other option is multiple trips with just your van or truck just for material/tool delivery and pick up.

    If space is that small, other contractors are going to have similar problems. As electricians we maybe have it a little easier as we don't typically have all that large of individual items for most dwelling applications and actually can bring items one van load at a time easier then some other trades can do with what they sometimes bring.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    That still is dependent on why you are there. Service calls and one afternoon installations might not warrant the trailer. Total renovation, you might be parking that trailer in the yard(if necessary) for a few days, or even getting permission to park it somewhere nearby but on other property.

    If there is space to unload tools/equipment at the site maybe you only bring trailer first day to unload, and sometime near the end of project to load items no longer needed. Other option is multiple trips with just your van or truck just for material/tool delivery and pick up.

    If space is that small, other contractors are going to have similar problems. As electricians we maybe have it a little easier as we don't typically have all that large of individual items for most dwelling applications and actually can bring items one van load at a time easier then some other trades can do with what they sometimes bring.
    Agreed. I was referring to service calls. For large, multiday jobs, I drop a gangbox from a pickup truck.

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    I have the Ram 1500 and love it. My previous van was a Ford E250 which I liked but did not like getting inside the cargo space on my hands and knees. I can walk around inside the new van by just tilting my head a little and I don’t even have the tall version. What I like most is the ability to store a 6’ stepladder sideways behind the protective wall. I do need to use a 4’ stepladder to get ladders on and off the roof but it’s not a big deal.

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    It looks like even the 1500 ram van is 8550lb gvw with a over 3500lb payload.
    They all use the same engine and trans no matter what version so it looks like suspension is the only changes if you go 2500 or 3500.

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