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Thread: Wall Oven Whip

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldstar View Post
    At first glance it looked like a single wall oven which in most cases would require a 30A circuit. However, looking at the KW rating on the nameplate it's 6.4 KW. 6400 divided by 240V = 26 A. 80% of a 30A circuit would be 24A. So, you'll have to go to the next trade size and use a 40A circuit. That being said, I don't know if you'll have the room to mount a 50A receptacle behind the oven. If not, I'd cut the plug off, wire it direct and drop the JB inside the wall.
    The prints call for a 1 phase, 208 volt, 30 amp circuit with a 4-wire receptacle behind the unit. Someone else is buying the ovens and they're being delivered as pictured with cord and plug which IMO is not permitted because of the temperature rating of the cord conductors and the listing instructions.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    Thank you both. Always an education here. This for us would be flexible cable or flex.



    Wrong colours but you get the idea.
    The lead that plugs into a receptacle for for something like a table lamp would also be called a flex.
    Many cables, cords etc are flexible but for some reason the term flex came to mean FMC. There is flexible non metallic conduit etc but the one pictured below is what has been termed flex in most areas that I have been in.

    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  3. #13
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    Feb 2003
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    The only built in ovens I regularly work with that have factory installed cords are Miele. They do this for ease of installation and service by their technicians.
    In order to get full warranty coverage Miele employee technicians are supposed to install all of their appliances.
    Curt Swartz
    Electrical Contractor

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    Many cables, cords etc are flexible but for some reason the term flex came to mean FMC. There is flexible non metallic conduit etc but the one pictured below is what has been termed flex in most areas that I have been in.

    I have seen that used but not in a long while. Oddly the last time was on the connection to the drive motor on a a machine manufacturing Kopex. Kopex is flexible metal conduit.
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrofelon View Post
    I don't think an oven Is a continuous load.
    I'm not sure I agree and I'm not understanding why that would come into play with this unit. If your wife decided to slow cook something for several hours wouldn't that be considered a continuous load?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    The prints call for a 1 phase, 208 volt, 30 amp circuit with a 4-wire receptacle behind the unit.
    See if you can find the installation instructions on-line before the unit arrives. Maybe it will tell you exactly where to locate the receptacle.
    Someone else is buying the ovens and they're being delivered as pictured with cord and plug which IMO is not permitted because of the temperature rating of the cord conductors and the listing instructions.
    If it comes shipped in that way from the factory then that's not your concern, it's the manufacturer's. If they got it through UL with that cord then away we go.

  7. #17
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    Dec 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldstar View Post
    I'm not sure I agree and I'm not understanding why that would come into play with this unit. If your wife decided to slow cook something for several hours wouldn't that be considered a continuous load?
    An oven is not considered a continuous load because it doesn't use full power for 3 hours. The thermostat kicks it on/off enough that the load is not continuous.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Bill View Post
    An oven is not considered a continuous load because it doesn't use full power for 3 hours. The thermostat kicks it on/off enough that the load is not continuous.
    OK. I'll buy that.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldstar View Post
    See if you can find the installation instructions on-line before the unit arrives. Maybe it will tell you exactly where to locate the receptacle. If it comes shipped in that way from the factory then that's not your concern, it's the manufacturer's. If they got it through UL with that cord then away we go.
    From what I've read these units are only to be used with the factory whip. Someone, probably the store selling them, is re-wiring them with a cord and plug. We're looking a few hundred units that already have a 30 amp receptacle roughed in that are IMO all incorrect.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  10. #20
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    It looks like someone was trying for a 422.16B3, but may have not paid attention to the last paragraph.....

    (3) Wall-Mounted Ovens and Counter-Mounted Cooking Units.
    Wall-mounted ovens and counter-mounted cooking units
    complete with provisions for mounting and for making electri‐
    cal connections shall be permitted to be permanently connec‐
    ted or, only for ease in servicing or for installation, cord-and-
    plug-connected.
    A separable connector or a plug and receptacle combination
    in the supply line to an oven or cooking unit shall be approved
    for the temperature of the space in which it is located.
    ~RJ~

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