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Thread: Wall Oven Whip

  1. #1
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    Wall Oven Whip

    Looking at this wall oven which came from the supplier with a cord and plug connection. I can't recall seeing this type of oven with a cord and plug only hardwired with a factory whip. Looking at the way it's installed (a strap that is large enough for a FMC whip) it's my guess that someone removed the factory whip and installed the cord. Factory whips usually have higher temperature conductors than cord sets and these ovens are not designed for cord an plug. Opinions?

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    Last edited by Little Bill; 06-06-18 at 08:38 AM. Reason: changed "code" to "cord"
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    Looking at this wall oven which came from the supplier with a code and plug connection. I can't recall seeing this type of oven with a cord and plug only hardwired with a factory whip. Looking at the way it's installed (a strap that is large enough for a FMC whip) it's my guess that someone removed the factory whip and installed the cord. Factory whips usually have higher temperature conductors than cord sets and these ovens are not designed for cord an plug. Opinions?

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	20501

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	20502

    Vendor data shows fixed connection, no plug.

  3. #3
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    I have never seen one like that either. They always come with flex not cord....
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    I have never seen one like that either. They always come with flex not cord....
    Ignorant Brit strikes again....
    What's the difference between a flex and a cord?
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    Ignorant Brit strikes again....
    What's the difference between a flex and a cord?
    Flex is an armored cable (i.e MC or AC cable).

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldstar View Post
    Flex is an armored cable (i.e MC or AC cable).

    Or FMC (flexible metal conduit)-- flex is a metallic conduit with no conductors in it. Of course, there are conductors in the flex coming from the back of the range but as Trevor stated the wires are usually a higher temperature conductor.
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  7. #7
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    At first glance it looked like a single wall oven which in most cases would require a 30A circuit. However, looking at the KW rating on the nameplate it's 6.4 KW. 6400 divided by 240V = 26 A. 80% of a 30A circuit would be 24A. So, you'll have to go to the next trade size and use a 40A circuit. That being said, I don't know if you'll have the room to mount a 50A receptacle behind the oven. If not, I'd cut the plug off, wire it direct and drop the JB inside the wall.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldstar View Post
    At first glance it looked like a single wall oven which in most cases would require a 30A circuit. However, looking at the KW rating on the nameplate it's 6.4 KW. 6400 divided by 240V = 26 A. 80% of a 30A circuit would be 24A. So, you'll have to go to the next trade size and use a 40A circuit. That being said, I don't know if you'll have the room to mount a 50A receptacle behind the oven. If not, I'd cut the plug off, wire it direct and drop the JB inside the wall.
    I don't think an oven Is a continuous load.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrofelon View Post
    I don't think an oven Is a continuous load.

    Agreed
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    Or FMC (flexible metal conduit)-- flex is a metallic conduit with no conductors in it. Of course, there are conductors in the flex coming from the back of the range but as Trevor stated the wires are usually a higher temperature conductor.
    Thank you both. Always an education here. This for us would be flexible cable or flex.



    Wrong colours but you get the idea.
    The lead that plugs into a receptacle for for something like a table lamp would also be called a flex.
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

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