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Thread: Commerical fryer

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    .

    You need to look at the definition of a continuous load in article 100.
    Agreed, it would be an extreme long shot that the load would run continuous on any fryer demand.

    Roger
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    .

    You need to look at the definition of a continuous load in article 100.

    Continuous load: a load where the maximum current is expected to continue for 3 hours or more.

    I would expect that the local Chick-fil-A, which has a line of cars wrapped around the building from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., and a lobby full of people during the same time, would have its deep fryers under non-stop heating during that timeframe. Other restaurants with the deep fryers in sight of the customers, I have seen them frequently go into low oil temperature, and they have to wait for the deep fryers to come back up to minimum cooking temperature.

    If you drop basket after basket of frozen french fries, chicken, egg rolls, or whatever into a deep fryer hours on end, would you not expect the elements to be on the entire time?
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    Continuous load: a load where the maximum current is expected to continue for 3 hours or more.

    I would expect that the local Chick-fil-A, which has a line of cars wrapped around the building from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., and a lobby full of people during the same time, would have its deep fryers under non-stop heating during that timeframe. Other restaurants with the deep fryers in sight of the customers, I have seen them frequently go into low oil temperature, and they have to wait for the deep fryers to come back up to minimum cooking temperature.

    If you drop basket after basket of frozen french fries, chicken, egg rolls, or whatever into a deep fryer hours on end, would you not expect the elements to be on the entire time?
    The definition states that those 3 hours must be continuous and the unit must run at it maximum output for those three hours. Although these units can be on all day long since they units have thermostats they will not run continuously for three hours at their maximum output.
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    The definition states that those 3 hours must be continuous and the unit must run at it maximum output for those three hours. Although these units can be on all day long since they units have thermostats they will not run continuously for three hours at their maximum output.

    If they never reach their temperature set point, the heating elements will never turn off correct? Similar to opening the hot water valve in your bathtub and letting hot water run continuously, your water heaters elements, seeing a steady flow of cold water, would never turn off.

    I will freely admit not many restaurants are this busy for this long, however most deep fryers I have seen, are run at their maximum, possibly beyond, loading, and will have their heating elements on so long as you keep putting food in to them to cook.

    Edited to add... The last oven I installed, I remember the thermostat clicked on and off even if the temperature was rising... if deep fryers are designed the same way, they may not run continuously for 3 hours. I suppose it really boils down to the power of the fryer and how much product is put into it. I would think a commercial fryer not at set point would run its elements continuously right up to the point of the thermostat setting, tho I admit that train of thought maybe in err.
    Last edited by JFletcher; 06-09-18 at 09:04 PM.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    Which is safer electrical point to assume continuous or non continuous load?
    Continuous, definitely, as that calls for the larger of the circuit size options.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
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    Richmond, VA

  6. #16
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    You have to ask yourself, up front, what the difference in cost is between running #8's and # 6's. If you run # 8's and for whatever wierd reason start to have a breaker tripping problem somewhere down the line it's going to be a lot more expensive (overall) to pull out the 8's and install 6's. Just my opinion but for peace of mind, like Larry, I'd install the 50 amp circuit.

  7. #17
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    It's probably going to be a 50 amp circuit anyway, unless it's a 60 degree wiring method like nm or there is derating.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrofelon View Post
    It's probably going to be a 50 amp circuit anyway, unless it's a 60 degree wiring method like nm or there is derating.
    I was thinking that too if you had something like #8 AWG MC cable for the branch circuit which is good for 50 amps at 75° C, but do they make 75° C rated terminals on a 50 amp receptacle?
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by codequestion View Post
    This is not what I am exactly clear on:

    39x100% = 39 next rating 40 amps

    or

    39x1.25 = 48.75 next rating 50 amps.

    Is commerical fryer continous load or noncontinous load?

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

    I would think a fryer would be noncontinous. Hard to believe a fryer running for 3 hrs.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthisworld View Post
    I would think a fryer would be noncontinous. Hard to believe a fryer running for 3 hrs.
    IMHO, as long as it reaches a given temperature, turns off and then turns back on "x" amount of minutes later I'm guessing it would be considered non-continuous.

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