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Thread: generator transfer switch and main service panel

  1. #1

    generator transfer switch and main service panel

    I would like to install a generator transfer switch next to my service panel. I want to disconnect the service conductors from the main breaker and run them thru a short nipple to the transfer switch, then from the transfer switch back to the main service panel breaker. This would mean using the existing service panel as a feed thru to the transfer switch and then back to the main in the service panel. Is this permissible by the NEC ?

  2. #2
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    What you are talking about is not a "feed through", that would mean using lugs on the buss in the panel to feed another panel.

    What you would have is a transfer switch fed after the service disconnect. It is not an NEC violation. It's the way I prefer to wire transfer switches.
    If you go and decide to dance with a gorilla the dance ain't over till the gorilla decides it's over.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    What you would have is a transfer switch fed after the service disconnect. It is not an NEC violation. It's the way I prefer to wire transfer switches.
    Sounds to me like the transfer switch is technically before the service disconnect in the panel.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  4. #4
    I think maybe I gave the wrong description of my set up. I have a 30+ circuit breaker panel with a main circuit breaker. The service conductors from the outdoor meter can enter the top of my circuit breaker panel which is located in my basement. I want to locate the generator transfer switch right next to my circuit breaker panel. I would like to disconnect the incoming service conductors from my main breaker in the circuit breaker panel and re-route them thru a nipple to the generator transfer switch. From the transfer switch....I would run to the main circuit breaker in my panel. So....the incoming line would pass thru my main circuit breaker panel, connect to the transfer switch, then run back to the main circuit breaker in my circuit breaker panel.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by dec View Post
    I think maybe I gave the wrong description of my set up. I have a 30+ circuit breaker panel with a main circuit breaker. The service conductors from the outdoor meter can enter the top of my circuit breaker panel which is located in my basement. I want to locate the generator transfer switch right next to my circuit breaker panel. I would like to disconnect the incoming service conductors from my main breaker in the circuit breaker panel and re-route them thru a nipple to the generator transfer switch. From the transfer switch....I would run to the main circuit breaker in my panel. So....the incoming line would pass thru my main circuit breaker panel, connect to the transfer switch, then run back to the main circuit breaker in my circuit breaker panel.
    In that case you would need a service rated transfer switch and your main breaker panel would become a sub panel.
    If you go and decide to dance with a gorilla the dance ain't over till the gorilla decides it's over.

  6. #6
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    Are you using a service rated transfer switch?
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  7. #7
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    I've never seen anyone leave SE conductors long enough that they could be re-routed to another panel!

    Also, wouldn't that violate the rule of not having any conductors beside the service conductors in a raceway? The way I see it he would have the main service wires then a feeder set in the same raceway.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    In that case you would need a service rated transfer switch and your main breaker panel would become a sub panel.
    Along with relocating the GECs to the TS and making sure the EGCs and neutrals are separated, with the neutrals isolated, and, technically speaking, making sure the major-appliance circuits are 4-wire supplied and wired.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Bill View Post
    I've never seen anyone leave SE conductors long enough that they could be re-routed to another panel!
    No, he'd need to use splices.

    Also, wouldn't that violate the rule of not having any conductors beside the service conductors in a raceway? The way I see it he would have the main service wires then a feeder set in the same raceway.
    As well as in the panel itself.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  10. #10
    The service conductors would land on a properly sized transfer switch and would not share the raceway with the conductors going back to the main breaker. All service conductors and the GEC would be new (no splices).

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