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Thread: Ufer ground tag, I'm not sure about this

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by jap View Post
    I'm sorry, but I don't consider rebar a ferrous metal raceways, cable armor, boxes, cable sheathing, cabinets, elbows, couplings, nipples, fittings, supports, and support hardware.

    And.

    Agreed


    To say it can't be in contact with the dirt would be a far stretch to convince me of also.

    JAP>
    It is in the listing of the rebar. Rebar will rust and many inspectors will turn it down if the cee is connected to it underground. Why is that hard to believe. Check with some building inspectors- go on some engineering sites to check it out. Of course, you don't have to believe them either.
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    Rebar will rust and many inspectors will turn it down if the cee is connected to it underground.

    I can see the rebar rusting, but, a lot would have to happen for the rebar to actually "break down there".

    I agree it might eventually rust in half, but probably not in my lifetime.

    Oh well, the rebar thing would not be my first choice for a CEE anyway.

    JAP>

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenje View Post
    Take a look at 250.68(C)(3) 2017 NEC
    I did not fully read the post and thought that the rebar was bent outside of the building and then bent back inside the wall leaving part of the rebar exposed to the elements. My mistake. The code article that I posted does not apply to the original post.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jap View Post
    I can see the rebar rusting, but, a lot would have to happen for the rebar to actually "break down there".

    I agree it might eventually rust in half, but probably not in my lifetime.

    Oh well, the rebar thing would not be my first choice for a CEE anyway.

    JAP>

    It depends on the type of soil. I have read from 1 year to 10 years but I don't know. Ground rods rust also and have a lifespan of 20-30 years depending whether it is galvanized or copper.
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  5. #15
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    3,660
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    It depends on the type of soil. I have read from 1 year to 10 years but I don't know. Ground rods rust also and have a lifespan of 20-30 years depending whether it is galvanized or copper.
    I'm with ya on that.

    I had a 15' piece of 3/4" rigid run from my house to feed my garage when I first moved in thinking it would last forever.

    After about 10 years I dug down to pour concrete and found that there was nothing more than the wire left in the dirt.

    The pipe had completely disintegrated around it.

    Thanks for the information. I never knew until know the rebar wasn't to come in contact with the earth.


    JAP>

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jap View Post
    I'm with ya on that.

    I had a 15' piece of 3/4" rigid run from my house to feed my garage when I first moved in thinking it would last forever.

    After about 10 years I dug down to pour concrete and found that there was nothing more than the wire left in the dirt.

    The pipe had completely disintegrated around it.

    Thanks for the information. I never knew until know the rebar wasn't to come in contact with the earth.


    JAP>
    I remembered this thread while readingup on something and I saw this.

    Quote Originally Posted by 250.66(C)(3)
    A rebar-type concrete-encased electrode installed in
    accordance with 250.52(A)(3) with an additional rebar
    section extended from its location within the concrete to
    an accessible location that is not subject to corrosion shall
    be permitted for connection of grounding electrode
    conductors and bonding jumpers. The rebar extension
    shall not be exposed to contact with the earth without
    corrosion protection
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  7. #17
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    May 2018
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    Jamaica and london
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    Having dealt with all the concrete and rebar homes in Jamaica I can tell you that rebar rusts bad... in salty air like we have in the islands within twenty miles of sea...
    So the rules of making sure the rebar is covered by two inches of cement make sense as I have seen it rust.. Twist wire or baling wire rusts in a year in the air.. but is still good twenty years later in the concrete... even in roof decking... Dont know how long after that as only damaged structure I have dealt with was twenty years old.. Concrete was breaking down due to improper mix so we had to break it loose and re pour the deck... customer had been complaining of water leaking inside..lol...

    But, I have seen clear poly spray used over connections before and keep the rebar from rusting. Of course, we also used vaseline.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jap View Post
    I'm sorry, but I don't consider rebar a ferrous metal raceways, cable armor, boxes, cable sheathing, cabinets, elbows, couplings, nipples, fittings, supports, and support hardware.

    And.

    To say it can't be in contact with the dirt would be a far stretch to convince me of also.

    JAP>
    Rebar is not allowed to be in contact with the dirt in the State of Florida.
    Unlimited Electric Contractor/Standard Electric Inspector/Traffic Signal Inspector/Highway Lighting and Level One Traffic Signal Installer.

    I know you believe that you understand what you think I said but I'm sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

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