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Thread: Pool equipment supply

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    2,444
    I have a contractor
    do those words mean same as "I am the GC", or perhaps you are the prime electrical outfit who sub'd out ??

    if you are the GC or prime, it's on you, if you are not the GC or prime then why worry about it?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Park Ridge, NJ
    Posts
    99
    If he's the last guy on the job, then he is liable.

    I would insist to the pool contractor corrections need to be made ASAP. If the pool contractor does not concede to the proper corrections, write a registered letter to the pool contractor, return receipt, stating the corrections needed to CYA!!!!! A paper trail is paramount. Now it's ALL on the pool contractor. I would keep a log of conversations and/or meetings with the pool contractor as a matter of record for your sake.

    Attorneys DO NOT like paper trails. Take photos if you can for further back up.

    As it's said, If you see something, say something

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by Mystic Pools View Post
    I, as a pool contractor, would be interested as to how this turns out. Keep us posted on results.
    I would be interested in how the GFCI for the cover can meet the equipotential bonding requirement. Equipotential within the pool perimeter does not equal equipotential at the Service. Even if everything else in and around the pool is bonded properly, I don't see how an external GFCI outlet (or any outlet for that matter) outside the equipotential perimeter can provide the same equipotential reference at the cover.

    Note: Although it can be difficult to "verify" proper bonding after the fact, it is often relatively easy to verify that it has not been done properly. Take a voltmeter and measure the voltage between the cover motor chassis and/or ground and the pool...and an assortment of other points around the pool. It you measure a potential difference, that's a sign of improper (or lack of) bonding. If you measure zero, then that doesn't equate to a proper bond...just not an indicator of an improper one.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
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    33,847
    Quote Originally Posted by JPinVA View Post
    I would be interested in how the GFCI for the cover can meet the equipotential bonding requirement.
    I am not sure I follow. The equipotential bonding has nothing to do with the gfci circuit.
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky



  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    I am not sure I follow. The equipotential bonding has nothing to do with the gfci circuit.
    I think that's the point. If the GFCI circuit has nothing to do with the equipotential bonding, then there is a good chance the GFCI circuit ground is different than the equipotential in the pool area. As the GFCI circuit will bring an EGC to the motor (as the ground fault path), it will unwittingly also energize the motor with the voltage difference between the GFCI ground and the equipotential voltage. EVERYTHING that can possibly carry current that enters the equipotential area must be bonded together to ensure all is the same potential...the very definition of equipotential bonding.

    Now, if one can show the GFCI ground and the equipotential ground will always be the same...then that's OK. That's what I'm looking for. I'm not sure how that can be accomplished unless the GFCI ground is explicitly part of the equipotential bound.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tennessee NEC:2008
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    4,907
    Quote Originally Posted by JPinVA View Post
    I think that's the point. If the GFCI circuit has nothing to do with the equipotential bonding, then there is a good chance the GFCI circuit ground is different than the equipotential in the pool area. As the GFCI circuit will bring an EGC to the motor (as the ground fault path), it will unwittingly also energize the motor with the voltage difference between the GFCI ground and the equipotential voltage. EVERYTHING that can possibly carry current that enters the equipotential area must be bonded together to ensure all is the same potential...the very definition of equipotential bonding.

    Now, if one can show the GFCI ground and the equipotential ground will always be the same...then that's OK. That's what I'm looking for. I'm not sure how that can be accomplished unless the GFCI ground is explicitly part of the equipotential bound.
    The equipotential bond goes to the pump motor as well as the EGC for the circuit. They will become "one" at that point. Also any other equipment that has a bonding lug, the EGC will bond there as well.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    38,500
    You can have many supply sources to pool items, equipotential bonding conductors are there primarily to bring them all to same potential regardless of what they may have for reference point before being connected to EBC.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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