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Thread: 0-10 volt dimmable LED troffer control wiring

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiElectrician View Post
    The thermostat wire must be rated for whatever the line voltage is. It isn't written on it, you have to look it up, and maybe print out the page for the inspector. Also mcled could be easier if they aren't already wired.
    I believe it’s 300 volts. Pretty standard.


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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    There is a reason it's not printed on the jacket, you're not supposed to know that information so you can use it for anything. All you need to know is the wire is listed as CL2 or CL3 and if you use it with a CL2 or CL3 power source you will be fine.

    No inspector should care about a spec sheet, only what is printed on the jacket.

    Of course, if you are using the wire in a non-NEC application- then you can use the spec sheet information as you see fit.

    -Hal
    I’m pretty sure it was on the jacket: 300 volts


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  3. #13
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    0-10 volt dimmable LED troffer control wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Fulthrotl View Post
    most inspectors are good with it.

    god help you if you get the guy in downtown LA who doesn't
    like that. he won't sign your job off. nope. nada.

    you'll redo it.

    ask your inspector, not us.

    you can also use MC with the control wires in it. perfectly compliant.

    your controls need to shut power off to the fixture when it's "off"

    there are 5% fixtures, and 1% fixtures, and sometimes it's hard to tell
    that there is light coming from a 1% fixture, but you want off to be off.
    It’s a very customized retrofit situation. I’m aware of the MC w/ 16 or 18 awg control wires but this would not do me any good. The lights are controlled from a central MCU which is controlled by a building automation system. The power comes from several original lighting circuits on which the 3 and 4 way switches have been bypassed and blanked off. The control wire runs in a loop throughout the building and controls all the common area lighting.

    The lights are pitch black when the control wires are shorted. Is there anything in the code requiring the power to be disconnected when it’s automated by a computer?


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  4. #14
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    0-10 volt dimmable LED troffer control wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    you need to know is the wire is listed as CL2 or CL3 and if you use it with a CL2 or CL3 power source you will be fine.
    The control terminals are opto -isolated and a grounded metal barrier. Definitely CL2


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  5. #15
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    Massachusetts
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    Some drivers turn off at 0v. Others output a low level light (1% or a programmable value). If shorting the control wires does not turn off the light, you need to open the AC feed to the driver to turn them off.

    This controller, for example, provides the 0-10v control on the purple/grey wires and the switched line on the AC side (red wire)
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrSparks View Post
    I’m pretty sure it was on the jacket: 300 volts...
    ...The control terminals are opto -isolated and a grounded metal barrier. Definitely CL2
    You assume a lot! The rule is that if it doesn't actually say CL2 it's Class 1. I've never seen thermostat wire marked with a voltage for the reason I gave above.

    -Hal

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