Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: "Qualified Personel"

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3

    "Qualified Personel"

    I work in Massachusetts where it is required to have an Electrical License. Could my work place allow non licensed people that they deem "qualified"
    enter live electrical enclosures to perform activities such as troubleshooting, calibrations, etc.?

  2. #2
    KaBoom! is offline Inactive, Email Never Verified
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    63
    Yes.

    A state, county, or municipal license does not mean someone is qualified. Nor does the absence of that license mean they are not qualified.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Rutland, VT, USA
    Posts
    342
    29 CFR 1926.32(f) states: "Competent person" means on who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions, which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.


    29 CFR 1926.32(l) states: "Qualified" means one who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training and experience, has successfully demonstrated his ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the work, or the project.

    NFPA 70E-2018 states:Qualified Person is one who has demonstrated skills and knowledge related to the construction and operation of electrical equipment and installations and has receifved safety training to identify the hazards and reduce the associated risk.

    So, one does not need an electrical license to be a Qualified Person or a Competent Person

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Jamaica and london
    Posts
    735
    Quote Originally Posted by wbdvt View Post
    29 CFR 1926.32(f) states: "Competent person" means on who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions, which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.


    29 CFR 1926.32(l) states: "Qualified" means one who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training and experience, has successfully demonstrated his ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the work, or the project.

    NFPA 70E-2018 states:Qualified Person is one who has demonstrated skills and knowledge related to the construction and operation of electrical equipment and installations and has receifved safety training to identify the hazards and reduce the associated risk.

    So, one does not need an electrical license to be a Qualified Person or a Competent Person
    I quailify as competent in many ways but still am striving, slowly but surely, to be certified, not just competent.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    38,252
    Quote Originally Posted by wbdvt View Post
    29 CFR 1926.32(f) states: "Competent person" means on who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions, which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.


    29 CFR 1926.32(l) states: "Qualified" means one who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training and experience, has successfully demonstrated his ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the work, or the project.

    NFPA 70E-2018 states:Qualified Person is one who has demonstrated skills and knowledge related to the construction and operation of electrical equipment and installations and has receifved safety training to identify the hazards and reduce the associated risk.

    So, one does not need an electrical license to be a Qualified Person or a Competent Person
    All those definitions are similar in the fact they state the individual must have some sort of training, knowledge, authorization, experience, etc. and who determines just what those requirements are? The AHJ in many cases, especially when involving licensing aspect.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3
    So, we can take anyone without a license and make them "qualified" set them loose in a Live Electrical panel to do anything they want?
    Any Voltage? any task? No lines drawn? Seems iffy.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    38,252
    Quote Originally Posted by jchase View Post
    So, we can take anyone without a license and make them "qualified" set them loose in a Live Electrical panel to do anything they want?
    Any Voltage? any task? No lines drawn? Seems iffy.
    "License" is a term that may qualify them, especially for a particular AHJ.

    NFPA codes don't use "license" as the only thing that could "qualify" an individual, a city, state, municipal licensing department very well leans much more on that "license" as proof of qualification.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
    Posts
    8,113
    “Who is qualified” is a test that could ultimately be administered by a judge or jury should there be an accident involving an injury or death. In the mean time, it’s entirely possible that a business could be shut down pending that determination. It’s far far better for a company to carefully weigh the risk/reward consequences of any perceived convenience in a looser interpretation of “qualified”. Sticking to licensed/certified employees or contractors is a much much simpler way to go if you ask me.
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________
    Many people are shocked when they discover I am not a good electrician...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    38,252
    Quote Originally Posted by Jraef View Post
    “Who is qualified” is a test that could ultimately be administered by a judge or jury should there be an accident involving an injury or death. In the mean time, it’s entirely possible that a business could be shut down pending that determination. It’s far far better for a company to carefully weigh the risk/reward consequences of any perceived convenience in a looser interpretation of “qualified”. Sticking to licensed/certified employees or contractors is a much much simpler way to go if you ask me.
    And that judge is going to refer to any laws first (which will bring licensing into the determination in many cases), then maybe will consider what commonly used codes or standards have to say (NFPA 70, 70E in particular) which in many cases NFPA 70 will be mentioned in some law journals as a standard that is considered to be law in the jurisdiction.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    249
    Just as all licensed electricians are not qualified to work on all electrical equipment, all qualified persons do not necessarily need licenses, depending on the state you're in.

    For example, in Connecticut, licensed journeyman electricians may work only for licensed electrical contractors, who are defined by law as those who offer their services to the general public. In other words, businesses may employ unlicensed technicians to do electrical work on their own property, because they're not offering their services to the general public. By the same token, homeowners may do electrical work on their own property. So licensure depends on the state you're in.

    The next question is, what's the definition of "electrical work" insofar as the scope of your state's law? Is troubleshooting by the manufacturer's qualified technician "electrical work?" I'd argue that a specialist from the company that built the equipment is more qualified to work on it than a journeyman generalist. Similarly, some in-house electricians are quite qualified for that kind of work.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •