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Thread: NFPA 70E question, Energized Permit requireed Yes/NO?

  1. #1
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    NFPA 70E question, Energized Permit requireed Yes/NO?

    When our technicians need to replace 120 volt devices such as temperature or pressure switches; our policy for this job is to always work de-energized. To de-energize these devices they must go to a control cabinet with 120 volt exposed live parts and pull a small swing out control fuse.

    The first option of 70E is to not work energized if you don’t have to and if you must work energized you usually need a permit. However, though one would still need PPE, 70E does not require a permit for investigating, testing or troubleshooting, etc..
    In this case our goal is to work de-energized downstream from this panel by pulling a little control fuse.
    So, all that said, is the act of pulling this fuse so we can work de-energized, Permit Required Energized Work?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DCS View Post
    So, all that said, is the act of pulling this fuse so we can work de-energized, Permit Required Energized Work?
    Technically, yes, but if it opens like a switch, I wouldn't bother.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

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    Quote Originally Posted by DCS View Post
    When our technicians need to replace 120 volt devices such as temperature or pressure switches; our policy for this job is to always work de-energized. To de-energize these devices they must go to a control cabinet with 120 volt exposed live parts and pull a small swing out control fuse.

    The first option of 70E is to not work energized if you don’t have to and if you must work energized you usually need a permit. However, though one would still need PPE, 70E does not require a permit for investigating, testing or troubleshooting, etc..
    In this case our goal is to work de-energized downstream from this panel by pulling a little control fuse.
    So, all that said, is the act of pulling this fuse so we can work de-energized, Permit Required Energized Work?
    the act of then checking where you will be working to make sure you opened the right fuse is also energized work.
    Bob

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    Technically yes, but what you can do for something like this is to develop a "standing" work permit for this specific task. Post it, renew it annually. You don't have to issue a new permit everytime you do this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DCS View Post
    When our technicians need to replace 120 volt devices such as temperature or pressure switches; our policy for this job is to always work de-energized. To de-energize these devices they must go to a control cabinet with 120 volt exposed live parts and pull a small swing out control fuse.

    The first option of 70E is to not work energized if you don’t have to and if you must work energized you usually need a permit. However, though one would still need PPE, 70E does not require a permit for investigating, testing or troubleshooting, etc..
    In this case our goal is to work de-energized downstream from this panel by pulling a little control fuse.
    So, all that said, is the act of pulling this fuse so we can work de-energized, Permit Required Energized Work?
    So does the control panel have ONLY 120V parts in it? If so, the incident energy will likely be so low that the PPE required (1?) would be just what should be standard attire for electricians nowadays; Arc Resistant long sleeve cotton shirt and pants, safety glasses, leather shoes, leather gloves, ear plugs.
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