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Thread: EXAM PREP-Calculations & Tables

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    NEW BRAUNFELS TX USA
    Posts
    1

    EXAM PREP-Calculations & Tables

    Wondered how much time to devote to Calculations and Tables vs all other topics on the NEC Exam. (Sign Master-Texas).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    33,589
    Not certain about Texas but I would bet that between Tables and calculations there will be 30% of the test. This includes motors, a/c and article 220.
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    McKinney, Texas
    Posts
    1,444
    Well I can tell you about the Texas Exam. Since I assisted in writing the current exam and had to petition the state to allow me to take the exam so I could add it to my list of licenses (yeah I passed it...LOL) when I elected to stop volunteering as one of the states SME's. The exam is two parts in Texas now, one part knowledge and one part calculations. You have to pass both to obtain your Masters license. I would make sure you understand range calculations as well as some one and two level basic calculations as they are on the exam.

    Also make sure you understand how to apply the NEC when dealing with single phase ranges or dryers that are derived from a 3-phase system as that is almost guaranteed to be on the masters exam. There are a few basic raceway fill calculation questions that are not very hard but think through them closely before you rush to answer. There are also a few ohms law questions and a question on calculating the optional method for a all electric restaurant as expressed in 220.88 so don't loose an easy few points there...make sure you understand the table.

    Again the calculations are not tough but you are given 30 possible points and you need to achieve no less than 21 points to pass. Just also watch out for the low hanging fruit on understanding the 125% for continuous loads (as I am sure you already know) as well as when only 100% applies in situations where it is not a continuous load as some of those are thrown in to shake you up a bit.

    There are a few questions on box fill....just take it slow and use the dry erase pad to work it out. If you are a little rusty on box fill just familiarize yourself with it again and you should be fine.

    If I can think of any more I will update for you. The key is you have plenty of time to work them out......just relax as most of the calculations are not too deep in more than 2-3 steps.

    Update: I do remember (and probably helped write it..who knows) a few questions using 250.102(C)(1) for sizing bonding jumpers so brush up on that table as well.
    *All code responses are based on the 2017 National Electrical Code[NEC]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    McKinney, Texas
    Posts
    1,444
    Now that actually READ what exam you are taking.....slightly different advice...lol

    The exam is two parts in Texas now for the Master Electrician, one part knowledge and one part calculations. You have to pass both to obtain your Masters license. However, for the Master Sign Electrician it is still only one exam and it is predominantly knowledge based.

    There are a few basic raceway fill calculation questions that are not very hard but think through them closely before you rush to answer. There are also a few ohms law questions on the sign master exam to be aware of as well.

    Again the calculations are not tough on this exam. Just also watch out for the low hanging fruit on understanding the 125% for continuous loads (as I am sure you already know) as well as when only 100% applies in situations where it is not a continuous load as some of those are thrown in to shake you up a bit.

    There are a few questions on box fill which are on the master sign exam but very few....just take it slow and use the dry erase pad to work it out. If you are a little rusty on box fill just familiarize yourself with it again and you should be fine.

    If I can think of any more I will update for you. The key is you have plenty of time to work them out......just relax as most of the calculations are not too deep in more than 2-3 steps.

    I do remember (and probably helped write it..who knows) a few questions using 250.102(C)(1) for sizing bonding jumpers so brush up on that table as well as there will be some sizing the EGC (simple enough) on the exam so be ready for those. My advice on a single exam (unlike the Texas Masters) like the sign master, review it in 3 waves....make what you know without a doubt, then when you get to a tough one mark it and move on with the next. Skip all calculations unless they are easy and mark them for later. The concept it to build you some extra time to work on those calculations but in the end do well on the knowledge portion and you should be fine.

    There are a few basic motor questions on the exam...just be aware of 430.52 and how it is used and watch for the questions where they slide in AL Conductors into the question since we all know that on the Texas exam the default is always CU unless expressed otherwise. Yes, you will get a few questions that try to bring AL into the question.

    If I think of some more I will post them. Just did a video shoot at Encore all day and the mind is mush at the moment...
    *All code responses are based on the 2017 National Electrical Code[NEC]

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