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Thread: Ground Rod At the Water Main?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strathead View Post
    The first and foremost thing is to verify that the incoming water line complies with 250.52 (A)(1) I personally haven't seen a new construction project with a compliant incoming water pipe in at least a decade. That may be different in your area. Almost every plan I see though has a detail similar to the one you describe showing a copper water pipe. Second, you would never be required to put a ground rod anywhere in RELATION to the water main. If you require a ground rod, which is supplemental, then the usual desired place is as near as practical to the service bond point.
    But would not be a code violation to install a bonding jumper from water pipe to ground rod(s) either.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    But would not be a code violation to install a bonding jumper from water pipe to ground rod(s) either.

    Agreed, just a waste of money.


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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strathead View Post
    Agreed, just a waste of money.
    Maybe, maybe not. Every installation has it's own quirks. Though most the time the supplemental electrode seems to get landed at the service and not via bonding jumper from the water pipe.
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  4. #14
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    Ground Rod At the Water Main?

    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    But would not be a code violation to install a bonding jumper from water pipe to ground rod(s) either.
    You are allowed to bond GECs within 6 feet from where the water main enters the building. Before the meter or any dielectric fittings, of course, all of which require jumpers.

    IMO the water main cannot be assumed to be a reliable electrode as water utilities intentionally install dielectric fittings to reduce AC interference. They also are running steel sleeved in plastic and straight poly tube now as well.

    The incoming water metal water pipes still must be bonded to the GEC but should not be considered a viable electrode, regardless of CODE provisions.


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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrSparks View Post
    You are allowed to bond GECs within 6 feet from where the water main enters the building. Before the meter or any dielectric fittings, of course, all of which require jumpers.

    IMO the water main cannot be assumed to be a reliable electrode as water utilities intentionally install dielectric fittings to reduce AC interference. They also are running steel sleeved in plastic and straight poly tube now as well.

    The incoming water metal water pipes still must be bonded to the GEC but should not be considered a viable electrode, regardless of CODE provisions.
    Actually it's within 5' and you're correct metallic water pipe electrodes can be changed to a non-conductive material that's why the NEC requires that they're supplemented with another electrode.
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    Actually it's within 5' and you're correct metallic water pipe electrodes can be changed to a non-conductive material that's why the NEC requires that they're supplemented with another electrode.
    Which brings up what I believe he was trying to say is that if you installed your supplemental electrode (a ground rod) via bonding jumper from that first 5 feet of water pipe, then someday that water pipe gets replaced with non conductive pipe - you have also lost connection to the supplemental electrode.

    I don't think NEC addresses this specifically but is something that maybe needs some consideration. AFAIK you can connect that supplemental electrode to the first five feet of a water pipe electrode.
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Which brings up what I believe he was trying to say is that if you installed your supplemental electrode (a ground rod) via bonding jumper from that first 5 feet of water pipe, then someday that water pipe gets replaced with non conductive pipe - you have also lost connection to the supplemental electrode.

    I don't think NEC addresses this specifically but is something that maybe needs some consideration. AFAIK you can connect that supplemental electrode to the first five feet of a water pipe electrode.
    What you said is true but gets into the territory of "what ifs". I've seen plumbers work on water mains where they're done leave the clamps unconnected.
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkb View Post
    Stop shouting.



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