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Thread: Creating "critical loads" panel next to Main

  1. #1
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    Creating "critical loads" panel next to Main

    Hi All,

    Been getting a few battery backup/time of use jobs lately.

    My question is about moving circuits from the main panel to the "critical loads" panel. A friend of mine told me you cannot splice onto a circuit in the Main panel, extend it, then land in a new panel.

    Basically he is saying you are not supposed to use a panel as a "pass through" wireway for a circuit. So, we have been pulling the circuits we want out of the main, getting them in a gutter, and then splicing them from there into the new panel.

    Can anyone confirm or prove wrong his theory? Any code references to passing through a panel and not landing in it?

    thanks

  2. #2
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    You may both splice and pass through conductors in a panel board enclosure. See 312.8
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

  3. #3
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    I think this changed around the 2008 cycle or such. When I started in the industry I heard what that friend of yours told you quite a bit. Now I don't hear it anymore.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaggedben View Post
    I think this changed around the 2008 cycle or such. When I started in the industry I heard what that friend of yours told you quite a bit. Now I don't hear it anymore.
    It was always legal, but the old wording made it seem not to be. The section is much clearer now.
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jumper View Post
    You may both splice and pass through conductors in a panel board enclosure. See 312.8

    Thanks,

    Does that mean I would need a warning label saying where the closest disconnect is?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbartmasse r View Post
    Thanks,

    Does that mean I would need a warning label saying where the closest disconnect is?
    Yes.
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

  7. #7
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    Not exactly sure, but I believe the Canadian code requires the method described in the OP.

  8. #8
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    I have sat through a couple battery backup training courses where I was advised not to use the term "critical loads panel" to describe a typical residential backup loads panel. The NEC specifically defines the term "critical" as it applies to important backup loads, and there are a whole bunch of restrictions and requirements for "critical" systems. I use the term "backup loads panel".

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by PWDickerson View Post
    I have sat through a couple battery backup training courses where I was advised not to use the term "critical loads panel" to describe a typical residential backup loads panel. The NEC specifically defines the term "critical" as it applies to important backup loads, and there are a whole bunch of restrictions and requirements for "critical" systems. I use the term "backup loads panel".

    Agreed

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