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Thread: NEC provision for making connections with the Power On?

  1. #1
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    NEC provision for making connections with the Power On?

    Just ran across this Home Depot listing for this Klien linesmans that is rated for 1000v! Does that mean this tool will withstand stripping wire hot as long as it is under 1000v? Who needs to do that?

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Klein-To...-INS/100647694

  2. #2
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    I have had to pick up live voltage in a shop when a breaker would not trip and was between us and the breaker panel, after a hurricane damaged the building... very glad I had insulated gloves and insulated tools...

    that said, the design requirements for the tools are not so you can work on stuff live but are for those times you are rushing and forget to check the wires, because you are totally sure all the correct breakers were switched, or for when you thought only you were around, and you are fitting alight and someone turns on the light switch...

  3. #3
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    It's how the electrical trade gets rid of the DIYers. We had Klein make them for HD to sell.

    -Hal

  4. #4
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    The NEC does not care about live work. OSHA does.
    Bob

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by markebenson View Post
    Just ran across this Home Depot listing for this Klien linesmans that is rated for 1000v! Does that mean this tool will withstand stripping wire hot as long as it is under 1000v?
    No: That means that insulated tools with that rating are must be used if you're working within the Restricted Approach Boundary of an exposed current-carrying conductor, even if you're wearing insulating gloves and other arc-rated PPE. See NFPA 70E-2019, Art. 130.7(D)(1).

    If you will be working within the Limited Approach Boundary (3 ft. 6 in. at 301V to 1kV) you must have an Energized Electrical Work Permit, only allowed if the equipment must be energized for testing, or de-energizing would introduce new hazards or result in increased risk, or de-energizing is infeasible because of equipment design or operational limitations. You must use insulated tools if you'll be working within the Restricted Approach Boundary (301V-1kV, 1 ft.).

    Does that mean the tool can withstand a short? No. It means the likelihood of a short is less, because much of the tool is insulated, and the hand holding the tool wouldn't get a shock (remember, you'll be wearing insulating gloves, too). So yes, the tool will be still be fried in the unlikely event of a short.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by markebenson View Post
    Just ran across this Home Depot listing for this Klien linesmans that is rated for 1000v! Does that mean this tool will withstand stripping wire hot as long as it is under 1000v? Who needs to do that?

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Klein-To...-INS/100647694
    Working on and around 600+ vdc all of the time, all of our hand tools are rated for 1000 volts, but as mentioned, that only applies to the insulated handles. Short out the metal and you’ll see fireworks. More than just a couple of guys have lost their hands and more. So when feasible, we remove power. But that’s not always an option.

  7. #7
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    Look at the packaging I'd bet it says, not to be used on live circuits.

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