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Thread: Intent of 230.66

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Northglenn, CO
    Posts
    3

    Intent of 230.66

    We have a 460V service that is sole source for a deep well pump. The service is cold sequenced with a Heavy Duty, 600V, 3 pole, 60A fused, 3R disconnect switch that has 200K AIC class R fuses and has a service equipment listing. This disconnect is required by the Utility and becomes Utility owned once energized. This feeds a meter which originally fed a 3R, NEMA 12 pump panel. The pump panel has a fused disconnect with Class J fuses that are also 200K AIC rated. The pump panel does not have a Service Equipment listing as there is no neutral or one needed as the pump motor is 3 phase 460V. This was rejected by the AHJ since the pump panel is not listed as Service Equipment. The available fault current is below 20,000 amps. What is the purpose of 230.66 and why is this a code violation?

    Steve Yaussy - Master Electrician for the City of Northglenn, Colorado

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Collins, Colorado
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    2,698
    Quote Originally Posted by syaussy View Post
    We have a 460V service that is sole source for a deep well pump. The service is cold sequenced with a Heavy Duty, 600V, 3 pole, 60A fused, 3R disconnect switch that has 200K AIC class R fuses and has a service equipment listing. This disconnect is required by the Utility and becomes Utility owned once energized. This feeds a meter which originally fed a 3R, NEMA 12 pump panel. The pump panel has a fused disconnect with Class J fuses that are also 200K AIC rated. The pump panel does not have a Service Equipment listing as there is no neutral or one needed as the pump motor is 3 phase 460V. This was rejected by the AHJ since the pump panel is not listed as Service Equipment. The available fault current is below 20,000 amps. What is the purpose of 230.66 and why is this a code violation?

    Steve Yaussy - Master Electrician for the City of Northglenn, Colorado
    I think the inspector is correct. The fusible switch on the line side of the meter is not the service disconnect. It also should be marked per 230.82(3). Also note 230.92 may be an issue. And since the pump panel is not listed SUSE you are going to need a separate service disconnect.
    As a separate item, I note that you mention ""the available fault current is below 20,000 amps". What is the actual available at the terminals of the pump panel? And what is the AIC and SCCR rating of the pump panel?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
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    37,928
    Is this an item marketed as a "pump panel" or is it just a combination starter that you are calling a pump panel?

    "Pump panels" are typically listed "only for use as service equipment". Meaning they come with a grounded conductor terminal, but it is permanently bonded to the enclosure and not able to be isolated like many panelboard or safety switch grounded conductor terminals are - usually by removing a bonding screw.

    In many ways not really any different than a combination starter - other than listing and labeling.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Northglenn, CO
    Posts
    3

    Intent of 230.66

    The pump panel is a Schneider LE1D406C72 combination starter panel. The panel has a rating of 100K AIC at 600 volts. My actual available fault current at the disconnect is less than 2,000 amp (not 20,000). And by the way, I accepted the AHJ's determination and added another disconnect that was listed as "Service Equipment". But my real question is what makes it a listed piece of service equipment and the intent of 230.66?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Placerville, CA, USA
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    19,538
    Quote Originally Posted by syaussy View Post
    The pump panel is a Schneider LE1D406C72 combination starter panel. The panel has a rating of 100K AIC at 600 volts. My actual available fault current at the disconnect is less than 2,000 amp (not 20,000). And by the way, I accepted the AHJ's determination and added another disconnect that was listed as "Service Equipment". But my real question is what makes it a listed piece of service equipment and the intent of 230.66?
    What makes it a listed piece of service equipment for the purposes of 230.66 is a marking on the equipment and/or a mention in the specifications that it is:
    1. Suitable for use as service equipment, or
    2. Suitable for use only as service equipment (same as #1 but with neutral bonded to EGC and/or case).

    If it does not mention "service" it is not listed for service equipment use. Period.

    What allows the listing is testing of all aspects of the equipment with essentially unlimited fault current, up to the maximum that POCO specifies as available, as reflected in the AIC rating.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    711

    Meter Does not Exist

    The first disconnect would be the service disconnect if it was not utility-owned. Whether the service disconnect is before or after the meter is up to the utility and is not an NEC issue. But, since the service disconnect has to be operable by the owner, the utility owned switch is not a service disconnect.
    e^(i pi) = -1

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    4,577
    Quote Originally Posted by beanland View Post
    The first disconnect would be the service disconnect if it was not utility-owned. Whether the service disconnect is before or after the meter is up to the utility and is not an NEC issue. But, since the service disconnect has to be operable by the owner, the utility owned switch is not a service disconnect.
    Yup. This. ^^^ See definitions of Service Point, Service Conductors, and Service Equipment.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Cherry Valley NY, Seattle, WA
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    4,644
    Quote Originally Posted by beanland View Post
    The first disconnect would be the service disconnect if it was not utility-owned. Whether the service disconnect is before or after the meter is up to the utility and is not an NEC issue. But, since the service disconnect has to be operable by the owner, the utility owned switch is not a service disconnect.
    Im going to nit pick this a bit. As previously mentioned by Texie, there is 230.82(3). I dont think a meter disconnect switch is necessarily "utility owned". They may require it, and lock it, but that doesnt make them own it.

    IMO the NEC is vague on the distinction between a meter disconnect and service disconnect.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Northglenn, CO
    Posts
    3

    Intent of 230.66

    So, even though originally it didn't meet code, there was nothing inherently unsafe about it as I understand it. Now when it comes to troubleshooting...Is the prize behind door #1, door #2, or door #3?

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