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Thread: Master license holder

  1. #11
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    I wonder if my contractors insurance provider would create a disclaimer for employment like this?

    ~RJ~

  2. #12
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    Dec 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by romex jockey View Post
    I wonder if my contractors insurance provider would create a disclaimer for employment like this?

    ~RJ~
    I'm sure most would.

    Rules may be different in some places, you only need insurance here if you actually are contracting. One can hold a contractor license and not be contracting.

    One can have a contractor license and contract part of the time and work for an employer part of the time. Contractor insurance should only apply to the contracting activity and not the employment activity. In fact in the annual auditing they will look at activity and adjust premium according to that activity (the actual liability exposure) If you only had say $20k of receipts because you did this part of the time, your exposure is less, and so will be your premium than if you did this full time and had $500k in receipts. Type of projects you did and other details factor into premium some as well.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by elec24 View Post
    I work for a big company in the maintenance department and my department head has asked me to hold the Master's license for the company. Is anyone familiar with this situation and can you shed some light on any guidelines or repercussions this could have for my license? I am also interested in how much I should be asking for a raise if I hold the license. I would like to fully understand what is in involved with holding the license for a maintenance department as well as what it is worth. Not sure if they are willing to give me a raise but I'm curious what other people heard or know about the raise if any that should come with the responsibility. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance
    You can hold the masters for the company. You can also pull a maintenance permit for one year at a time in MA to cover all your work that you do. Document every bit of work that you do. I would recommend that you pull permits under the maintenance permit and send them in for all the work that you do. If the company subs work out (YOU NEED TO MAKE SURE THAT THE OTHER COMPANY PULLS A PERMIT FOR THE WORK THAT THEY DO.) You will be responsible for the work that goes on while you hold the masters and that will be there for life. Even if you leave the company your name is on it and if something should happen any parties involved could come after you. Just remember if you hold the masters everyone else is working for you and you are responsible for there mistakes if they are made.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 69gp View Post
    You can hold the masters for the company. You can also pull a maintenance permit for one year at a time in MA to cover all your work that you do. Document every bit of work that you do. I would recommend that you pull permits under the maintenance permit and send them in for all the work that you do. If the company subs work out (YOU NEED TO MAKE SURE THAT THE OTHER COMPANY PULLS A PERMIT FOR THE WORK THAT THEY DO.) You will be responsible for the work that goes on while you hold the masters and that will be there for life. Even if you leave the company your name is on it and if something should happen any parties involved could come after you. Just remember if you hold the masters everyone else is working for you and you are responsible for there mistakes if they are made.
    Is this reply based on laws where you or OP is located? If so that is fine, otherwise as I have already stated, one of the first things to do is find out exactly what the laws are. Even if the licensing AHJ doesn't require some of the things mentioned here, some liability may still fall on your shoulders or the company may at least try to put some blame on you and sue you should something bad happen and you maybe need to talk to an attorney as well to help you with making decisions on how to proceed.

    If you are going to be subject to a higher liability risk then you really need liability insurance for it, that alone justifies some increase in pay.

    A carefully written employment contract might be necessary to help ease up on any liability you may be subject to. Gross negligence is always going to be a losing battle if that comes into play, and insurance may not pay those incidents either.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Is this reply based on laws where you or OP is located? If so that is fine, otherwise as I have already stated, one of the first things to do is find out exactly what the laws are. Even if the licensing AHJ doesn't require some of the things mentioned here, some liability may still fall on your shoulders or the company may at least try to put some blame on you and sue you should something bad happen and you maybe need to talk to an attorney as well to help you with making decisions on how to proceed.

    If you are going to be subject to a higher liability risk then you really need liability insurance for it, that alone justifies some increase in pay.

    A carefully written employment contract might be necessary to help ease up on any liability you may be subject to. Gross negligence is always going to be a losing battle if that comes into play, and insurance may not pay those incidents either.
    Most of what I said is law. The part about documenting all the work you do and pulling a permit to supplement the maintenance permit that needs to be pulled is not required. Just when something does happen lawyers add everyone to a lawsuit and drop people off if its not related to the case. As for other contractors on the job. I always tell them to make sure they pull a permit. You have 3 days in MA to pull a permit after work starts. If I am the primary electrical contractor and you don't pull a permit in time I am on the phone to the wiring inspector.

    The reason why is if something does go wrong and I am the only one that pulls a permit then they are only coming after me. And I am not going to be responsible for someone else's mistakes.

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