Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Questions about Lutron Caseta wireless

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Valdosta, GA
    Posts
    4,201

    Questions about Lutron Caseta wireless

    My brother called me about installing Apple HomeKit compatible switches in his house.

    The only wireless switches I sell/install are Legrand, and their HomeKit stuff is a few months away.

    Anyhow, he wants to do the Lutron Caseta switches; I’ve never used these. He read through some of their brochures and said it showed mechanical 3-way switches being used with the Caseta wireless switch at the load.

    My question is, is the Caseta switch able to determine the status of the load if you’re using mechanical switches in the mix? Seems like you would not be able to tell if the light is off/on via HomeKit unless everything is wireless. The Legrand RF switches I use require everything in the circuit to be RF capable.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Brought to you by Carl's Jr.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Valdosta, GA
    Posts
    4,201
    Well nevermind; if I’d spent 5 minutes on the Lutron site I could’ve answered this.

    But I’ll leave this for anyone that comes along with the same question.

    On the mechanical 3-way, you run a jumper from one traveler to the common, so the load can always be passed through from Caseta. And then the other traveler, from what I can see, is used to signal the Caseta, so when power is on or off on that traveler, it knows the position of the switch. If that makes sense.

    Page 23....
    http://www.lutron.com/TechnicalDocum...structions.pdf


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Brought to you by Carl's Jr.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
    Posts
    3,899
    Why not just use a regular SP switch then? (I suppose the instructions are if you are installing the dimmer as a retrofit.)

    -Hal

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tennessee NEC:2008
    Posts
    4,848
    I've put in several Caseta switches and most were when a 3rd switch was needed or needed in a different location. You replace one of the existing 3-way switches with the Caseta and rewire the other with a jumper as Brant read. You can then add a PICO wireless switch where ever else you need a switch.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
    Posts
    3,899
    I was going to edit my post above to add that after I wrote it I did read the instruction sheet and my head hurts. Fifty something pages cover every permutation of possible 3-way switch installations for the DIY.

    -Hal

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    23,518
    This is noting new. The old X-10 companion remote switch worked the same way. One traveler fed through the companion to the source or load, and the other traveler allowed the companion to act as a remote controller for the main module.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tennessee NEC:2008
    Posts
    4,848
    Quote Originally Posted by LarryFine View Post
    This is noting new. The old X-10 companion remote switch worked the same way. One traveler fed through the companion to the source or load, and the other traveler allowed the companion to act as a remote controller for the main module.
    But the X-10 had to have the switch and main module on the same service leg. Or at least the ones I wired did.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    23,518
    Quote Originally Posted by Little Bill View Post
    But the X-10 had to have the switch and main module on the same service leg. Or at least the ones I wired did.
    I'm talking about hard-wired wall-switch modules and companion switches used to replace existing 3-way switch setups.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	mxYfoENGIgsaNDSzmVjFdrg.jpg 
Views:	37 
Size:	9.9 KB 
ID:	21239



    You're referring to remote control of wall switches using PLC (power-line carrier) technology, for which a phase bridge was used to couple the legs.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	s-l1600.jpg 
Views:	35 
Size:	29.4 KB 
ID:	21240
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tennessee NEC:2008
    Posts
    4,848
    Quote Originally Posted by LarryFine View Post
    I'm talking about hard-wired wall-switch modules and companion switches used to replace existing 3-way switch setups.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	mxYfoENGIgsaNDSzmVjFdrg.jpg 
Views:	37 
Size:	9.9 KB 
ID:	21239



    You're referring to remote control of wall switches using PLC (power-line carrier) technology, for which a phase bridge was used to couple the legs.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	s-l1600.jpg 
Views:	35 
Size:	29.4 KB 
ID:	21240
    Guess you're correct on that. But I didn't use the bridge, I was using the Insteon switch that was compatible with the X-10.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Jamaica and london
    Posts
    777
    I keep watching these to see if they end up with too many problems as it may be nice where I work at to be able to give customers two and three way switching from just one spot with the remotes wall mounted... when the cost comes down below what it costs to chisel out and install conduits and wires for the extra switch points will start getting them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •