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Thread: License to Survive

  1. #31
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    Dec 2012
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    Placerville, CA, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by sameguy View Post
    No problem and appreciate your response. My use of the k-word was due to his actions on a broad front of issues, not party affiliation.
    It is difficult to discuss legislation and keep politics out as it is very political; but yes I have seen other boards devolve into total anarchy due to people not being able to hold civil conversations. Something I have no intention or interest in doing, the anarchy part, I'm ok with civil conversation.
    Anarchy has its points too....
    Just not here.
    Good to see this discussion staying on track, and your input is also appreciated.

  2. #32
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    May 2009
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    Tougher licensing requirements would help.

  3. #33
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    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris1971 View Post
    Tougher licensing requirements would help.

  4. #34
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    In his penchant to pen Kentucky as some iconic solution for their sparky shortage, Mr. Matt Halverson convieniently leaves out the fact that many states already have instituted provisonal licensure , that which is regulated to specific (usually resi) electrical work ,inclusive of sharper oversight by fully licensed EC's ,along with their liability FOR such entities.

    ~RJ~

  5. #35
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    Vs, the provision licensure surrounding Kentucky.....

    ~RJ~

  6. #36
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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by romex jockey View Post
    I'm wondering how many of you have read 'License to Survive' in this months trade rag here (reg required)

    The short version is, the article is pointing out one state's manner of addressing their 'skilled labor drain', via introducing a bill dumbing down the entire process , further pointing to 'first time failure' rates for what WAS the norm for validation , and lauding it all as the shape of our future profession.

    I beg to differ.
    Kentucky does not have a "limited residential license" I wonder if that would be a better solution. I wonder how many states offer them? I Think the entire west coast does.
    What do you guys think?

  8. #38
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    Jan 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by romex jockey View Post

    Blame public education. But then again most educators are college grad, so... you might be right.
    I'm in over my head...

  9. #39
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    Jun 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortuga View Post
    Kentucky does not have a "limited residential license" I wonder if that would be a better solution. I wonder how many states offer them? I Think the entire west coast does.
    What do you guys think?
    Florida offers a residential only licence. IMHO you still have to understand and apply most (80%?) of the NEC to work in a residence competently. Should electricians have "just enough" training to do the job, or should they be fully competent in at least the broad strokes of the profession before you let them loose on the public? I vote for the latter. If people are unable to pass a competency test, they should work for others who can supervise them until such time as they can pass.

  10. #40
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    May 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coppersmith View Post
    Florida offers a residential only license. IMHO you still have to understand and apply most (80%?) of the NEC to work in a residence competently. Should electricians have "just enough" training to do the job, or should they be fully competent in at least the broad strokes of the profession before you let them loose on the public? I vote for the latter. If people are unable to pass a competency test, they should work for others who can supervise them until such time as they can pass.
    But, if you are an electrician who does all residential, in PVC or NMB mostly, and can understand the code book, plus have passed the basic tests, but yet are not knowledgeable in motor theory, trailer parks, modular homes, marinas, or high voltage and do not work in those areas either, should you be required to learn those before being licensed as a residential electrician?
    Student of electrical codes. Please Take others advice first.

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