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Thread: Abnormal high bill

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    The Motor City, Michigan USA
    Posts
    825
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Fix could have been as simple as cleaning/replacing filter. Little to no air over coil ... Should liquid eventually make it all the way to compressor - not good, probably stalling the compressor because liquid won't compress.
    A clogged condensate (water) drain can also cause this. The portion of the evaporator coil that's submerged doesn't get any airflow.

    Refrigerant doesn't suddenly go from vapor to liquid; it goes through phases -- first small droplets, then large, then a mix of vapor & liquid, then liquid with bubbles, then liquid. When a little bit of liquid refrigerant gets to the compressor, it's called "compressor slugging" and it'll still run. It'll sound like a Diesel engine and it's on the road to ruin, but it won't stop.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    732

    Time of Use (TOU)

    I may have missed it but I'm surprised no one has mentioned TOU metering. I remember out here during the advent of smart meters (9 yrs ago?) people were complaining about how high their utility bills had gotten since the new meters were installed. It took quite a learning curve before we all got used to using the washer/dryer, ironing clothes, vacuuming rugs, etc during off peak hours. And limiting any high energy activity between 12PM and 6PM during the week. Weekends were all off peak ( only 2 tiers.) Now the utility co has revamped their rate schedule with so many different tiers and rates (even weekends) that it takes an Einstein to figure out when to use what and when.
    Another thought that comes to mind is a faulty thermostat on the defrost element of a refer. This would probably show up as the refer not cooling the food and was wondering if anyone has experienced this?
    Am I in shape?? I get plenty of exercise pushing my luck!!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Southern Minnesota
    Posts
    4
    A neighbour once called me over and asked me what he should do. Something underground was shorting out, and I have to this day, never seen a meter spin so fast. It was before I was in the trade and I never heard what exactly happened, but man it made a horrid sound.

    I have also heard of well casing getting a hole in it so the pump never shuts off. Home owner won't usually notice anything for a long time since there is still normal water pressure.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NE (9.1 miles @5.07 Degrees from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    10,063
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy1845c View Post
    A neighbour once called me over and asked me what he should do. Something underground was shorting out, and I have to this day, never seen a meter spin so fast. It was before I was in the trade and I never heard what exactly happened, but man it made a horrid sound.

    I have also heard of well casing getting a hole in it so the pump never shuts off. Home owner won't usually notice anything for a long time since there is still normal water pressure.
    I found a well leaking like that. Customer complained of higher bill. She had history to verify it. I figured out what the additional load would be, clamped a meter on the wiring until I found the 6 amps.
    Tom
    TBLO

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Clark County, NV
    Posts
    1,211
    The most common one I see is the air conditioner being low on Freon. This causes it to run far longer (or continuously), and it's often the biggest load in a residence.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    38,252
    Quote Originally Posted by drcampbell View Post
    A clogged condensate (water) drain can also cause this. The portion of the evaporator coil that's submerged doesn't get any airflow.

    Refrigerant doesn't suddenly go from vapor to liquid; it goes through phases -- first small droplets, then large, then a mix of vapor & liquid, then liquid with bubbles, then liquid. When a little bit of liquid refrigerant gets to the compressor, it's called "compressor slugging" and it'll still run. It'll sound like a Diesel engine and it's on the road to ruin, but it won't stop.
    Usually on air conditioning there is a condensate catch pan only a few inches deep, if drain is plugged it overflows and makes a big mess instead of submerging a large portion of the coil in the water. What you said may be more common on some commercial refrigeration type equipment - like maybe supermarket display cases.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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