Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Fail Safe Relay

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6

    Fail Safe Relay

    This is probably an easy question for you guys but here goes:

    Lets say I have two lights controlled by one vacancy sensor/single pole switch. One light is normal and the other is emergency egress. In the case of a power outage, full power must be applied to the egress light. The product to accomplish this is an EELP RLS.

    I am assuming there would need need to be a 2 circuit power pack for my normal and emergency circuit? But where exactly does the above mentioned relay come into play? How would it be wired?

    Thanks guys in advance, if you need anymore info, I’ll be glad to add it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    nyc
    Posts
    168
    What is emergency power? Central inverter? Generator?

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NE (9.1 miles @5.07 Degrees from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    10,062
    Ignores proper connection of Emergency Power, etc.
    Name:  lighting.jpg
Views: 103
Size:  123.3 KB
    Tom
    TBLO

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ocala, Florida, USA
    Posts
    2,760
    Quote Originally Posted by Talome34 View Post
    This is probably an easy question for you guys but here goes:

    Lets say I have two lights controlled by one vacancy sensor/single pole switch. One light is normal and the other is emergency egress. In the case of a power outage, full power must be applied to the egress light. The product to accomplish this is an EELP RLS.

    I am assuming there would need need to be a 2 circuit power pack for my normal and emergency circuit? But where exactly does the above mentioned relay come into play? How would it be wired?

    Thanks guys in advance, if you need anymore info, I’ll be glad to add it.
    There is a diagram in your thread, and basically, the EELP is a listed emergency transfer switch (ETS), I assume. I didn't look it up but this is how they all work. It receives, emergency hot and neutral. It receives normal power hot, neutral and switch leg. On the output side you have a switch leg and a neutral. (proper grounding for all assumed) Under normal operation the ETS senses normal power from the normal power hot. It routes power from the normal switch leg and normal neutral to the output. So switch on, switch off affects the lights. When normal power goes down, the ETS sense it and switches to route power from the emergency power source both hot and neutral to the output. Normally there is a barrier that has to be installed in the box for the ETS to keep the emergency and the normal power separate per code.


    I know what I don't know, and I know where to go to find it!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by victor.cherkashi View Post
    What is emergency power? Central inverter? Generator?

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
    Generator

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Strathead View Post
    There is a diagram in your thread, and basically, the EELP is a listed emergency transfer switch (ETS), I assume. I didn't look it up but this is how they all work. It receives, emergency hot and neutral. It receives normal power hot, neutral and switch leg. On the output side you have a switch leg and a neutral. (proper grounding for all assumed) Under normal operation the ETS senses normal power from the normal power hot. It routes power from the normal switch leg and normal neutral to the output. So switch on, switch off affects the lights. When normal power goes down, the ETS sense it and switches to route power from the emergency power source both hot and neutral to the output. Normally there is a barrier that has to be installed in the box for the ETS to keep the emergency and the normal power separate per code.
    Makes perfect sense to think of it as a mini ATS. It gets both sources and the switchleg. In case of a normal power failure, it will transfer to emergency. And I guess the switch side of the ATS would open to prevent backfeeding to the switch itself.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ocala, Florida, USA
    Posts
    2,760
    Quote Originally Posted by Talome34 View Post
    Makes perfect sense to think of it as a mini ATS. It gets both sources and the switchleg. In case of a normal power failure, it will transfer to emergency. And I guess the switch side of the ATS would open to prevent backfeeding to the switch itself.
    It actually IS an automatic transfer switch that also must be listed for use as emergency article 700 equipment.


    I know what I don't know, and I know where to go to find it!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6
    Thanks so much for the great info. Glad I joined this community

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    nyc
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by Talome34 View Post
    Generator
    According to white paper in below link you can't use "EELP RLS" because it's not UL1008.
    I believe you need EPC-D-F-ATS, on website of the company you can find wiring diagrams.
    http://www.lvscontrols.com/assets/ep...Whitepaper.pdf
    http://www.lvscontrols.com/assets/ep...24_Control.pdf

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    North America
    Posts
    267

    Watch this legrand video


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •