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Thread: About 210.24 NEC

  1. #1
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    About 210.24 NEC

    Hello!!
    i have a question related with branch circuits... i´m a little bit confusing about requirements for branch circuits regarded in 210.11(C)

    Why doesn´t table 210.24 include requirements for receptacle circuits of 210.11(C)(1), (2) and (3)... ?
    What requirements does this table have that we can´t apply with those cases?
    and at the end....... Where can i find the requirements(similar as shown in table 210.24) for those cases?

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orestes.Cubas View Post
    Why doesn´t table 210.24 include requirements for receptacle circuits of 210.11(C)(1), (2) and (3)... ?
    My guess is because those circuits are required to be rated at 20 amps, and the table deals with circuits from 15 to 50 amps.

    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  3. #3
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    Thaks for your time Mr Charlie b

    I´m still confususing because in table 210.24(At least in 2014 NEC Edition ) there is a row for 20 Amps.. and 210.24 says:

    ....The requirements for circuits that have two or more receptacles, other than the receptacle circuits of 210.11(C)(1), (C)(2), and (C)(3), are summarized in table 210.24....

    i would like you could be more specific, Sir , in your guessing

    thanks again...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orestes.Cubas View Post
    I´m still confused because in table 210.24(At least in 2014 NEC Edition ) there is a row for 20 Amps.
    The 2017 edition has that column as well.

    The second sentence in paragraph 210.24 tells us that the table is a summary of requirements that are prescribed elsewhere. So it's not a matter of, "for requirements related to XXX circuits, go to the table, but for requirements related to YYY circuits, don't go to the table." Rather, the requirements are elsewhere, and the table is just a convenient place to see them all at once.

    As to why the article excludes three types of circuits, here again I can only guess. The table includes allowances for lighting outlets and taps. Neither of these would be allowed on a Small Appliance, Laundry, or Bathroom branch circuit. That is probably why those types of circuits were excluded from the table. I can envision a conflict of the following nature: Article 210.11(C)(2) says a laundry circuit can have no other outlets, but table 210.24 says that any type of lampholder can be installed on any 20 amp circuit.

    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  5. #5
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    Because the circuits described in 210.11(C)(1), (C)(2), and (C)(3) can have ONLY receptacles. T210.24 is for circuits having both receptacles and outlets.

    -Hal

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orestes.Cubas View Post
    Hello!!
    i have a question related with branch circuits... i´m a little bit confusing about requirements for branch circuits regarded in 210.11(C)

    Why doesn´t table 210.24 include requirements for receptacle circuits of 210.11(C)(1), (2) and (3)... ?
    What requirements does this table have that we can´t apply with those cases?
    and at the end....... Where can i find the requirements(similar as shown in table 210.24) for those cases?

    thanks
    I was confused myself when first learning until I realised that all four of the circuits in the one section are special use circuits: they are specific rooms only, usually to supply no other room. There is an exception for Garages, that they can serve readily accessible outside outlets as well, but, the bathroom circuits may only serve bathrooms, the kitchen circuits, or small appliance circuits, rather, may only serve the kitchen, dining room and pantry, and the laundry circuit may only serve the laundry room. In some cases, like the laundry circuit, you still have need of another specific circuit for the dryer, if one is installed. I think in the USA it is mandatory to wire for one, while I am not required to wire or even leave breaker space for one in the Caribbean because dryers are very hard to find in appliance stores.
    Or you have the kitchen, where again, once you have those two appliance circuits, and in some fancy homes that might be three or even four circuits, you might also have a separate microwave circuit (required to be separate in Jamaica), the range circuit, an exhaust hood circuit, a garbage disposal circuit, a freezer circuit and a refrigerator circuit. Now, in my area, all of those are separate breakers and can not be shared, not even on an MWBC, even though I am allowed an MWBC for the appliance circuits. Your local codes may be different.
    Student of electrical codes. Please Take others advice first.

  7. #7
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    Aside to Adamjamma: A comment of yours that had been located here has been moved to a thread of its own. That thread is here:
    http://forums.mikeholt.com/showthrea...77#post1949277
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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