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Thread: Here's why drywallers should be licensed

  1. #31
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    Dec 2010
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    Tennessee NEC:2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coppersmith View Post
    As an aside, how do you people find hidden boxes when you have no pictures or foreknowledge available? In the past I have noticed places where there should be a box (logically/per code) and then put my eye right next to the wall to see the bulge in the drywall where the box seems to be, but I still end up making extra holes until I find it. I've looked at Walabot and Flir tools. Anybody have a really good method/tool?
    I use either a 4' level or 2' if I don't have the 4' handy. Go to where there "should" be a receptacle or switch. Take the level and place it on the wall at the suspected location. You will find a high spot and the level will rock on it instead of laying flat. Then take a drywall knife and cut into the high spot, cut up/down, left/right until you find the inside edges of the box. When you find the inside edge of the box, move the knife over to find the outside edge and cut out around it.
    When the cut around the box is made you will usually get some "nail pops" when you push the drywall back against the studs.

    Then call the drywallers to repair the nail pops!
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Park Ridge, NJ
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    98
    Drywaller covered an 2" LB in a mechanical where our power for the pool equipment emanated. It was new (cheaper) crew at this development.

    As far a licensing, NJ is pushing for specific pool contractors licensing-service or construction. It's a joke and nothing but a money maker for the state.
    Connecticut and Long Island only at this point require that specific license.


    Individuals take a short course and then voila, your licensed. No journeyman process like electricians or plumbers. I'm a bit ashamed my industry is like this.
    There has been mutterings of doing a journeyman program for some time. There is an educational outfit offering terrific (expensive) courses for doing pool/spa work properly, but they offer no licensing to satisfy any of the states.


    I may be "grandfathered" as I have been in business for 32 years-however, I am not counting on not having to take a course-but the state will gladly take my money.

    There's no substitute for experience.


    ALL NJ contractors presently must have a home improvement contractors license.

  3. #33
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    Apr 2006
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    Simi Valley, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by romex jockey View Post
    How many jobs can you recall intricate details of 3-4 months after the 'crew' that set up camp finally calls you back John?

    But in your defense, those of us that rope every resi job up same same don't need much of a memory

    Seriously, many of us that have done our time, done our homework, cracked the books in this mans trade have simply had the radish with the 'star wars bar scene' contingent of hacks we daily have to interface with

    Attachment 21418

    ~RJ~
    Don't have to remember with residential, you have required spacing and things that you have to put in, like I said a receptacle every 12' if you see a spot 24' long, you probably have something buried, where I don't know exactly, but you should realize it's missing.
    I can build anything you want if you draw a picture of it on the back of a big enough check.

    There's no substitute for hard work....but that doesn't mean I'm going to give up trying to find one.

    John Childress
    Electrical Inspector
    IAEI / CEI / C10
    Certified Electrical Inspector

  4. #34
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    Jun 2016
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    Tampa, FL, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyjwc View Post
    Don't have to remember with residential, you have required spacing and things that you have to put in, like I said a receptacle every 12' if you see a spot 24' long, you probably have something buried, where I don't know exactly, but you should realize it's missing.
    Uh no. In old buildings, the spacing is definitely not every 12'.

    Even in brand new construction, the boxes are probably closer and not necessarily evenly spaced unless it's a huge room. And what about hallways that only require a single box somewhere? Where is somewhere?

  5. #35
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    27

    Marking fixture and device locations before drywall to be hung

    Quote Originally Posted by edward View Post
    I mark the floor with bright orange paint. It is easier to see where my boxes are/were after sheetrock.
    Just did this on a place I'm building as well as write the # of gangs and center height of each box. Also dropped plumb lines down from all ceiling fixtures to mark centers centers. Was a bit of a PITA but will save me mucho time if anything gets covered. I haven't any free time to go on a treasure hunt due to the fact the drywall guys are moving 90 mph on my job. I buy the Krylon fluorescent orange paint at WallyMart to do this. Minimal investment in time and material to avoid headaches later.

  6. #36
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    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyjwc View Post
    I always like when I notice the buried receptacle or switch. I asked an electrician one time how you turned the lights on in a room and I got the "really dude?" look, that was until he started looking around the room.

    I just figure that at the least you should have a receptacle every 12' and a switch in every room and if you're setting finish and you don't notice that, it's as much on you as the drywaller.
    Plus the wiring isn’t going to work when energizing so they gotta fix even if gets by you.

    Ain’t no one paying for stuff that doesn’t work.
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Huntley, Illinois, USA
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    8
    I've actually had drywallers cover up my can lights, with bulbs in them. You would think that when the room got dark that would have been a clue.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  8. #38
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Jamaica and london
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    932
    there used to be a device that you could hook to the wires and then use another device to track the signal... it worked because the signal it was recieving was only at most a foot away from the one thing... I used it in eighties to track metal conduit, knob and tube, and other wires hidden in walls... it came in a kit from Radio Shack, in two boards... and worked kind of like a metal detector radio reciever...

    But the wires had to be off to hook up to.

    Pretty sure there has to be something similar now in the stores, maybe in the IT world, to allow you to trace a circuit at a certain distance then get a finer trace for exact wires...
    Student of electrical codes. Please Take others advice first.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Williamsburg, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adamjamma View Post

    Pretty sure there has to be something similar now in the stores, maybe in the IT world, to allow you to trace a circuit at a certain distance then get a finer trace for exact wires...
    There is, it's called a TDR, or time domain reflectometer.

    I have also used a telecom toner and wand to find buried junction boxes.

    The last 'high end' residential job I did, the wall detail was changed after we set our boxes to include 5/8 in thick wainscoting a top double drywall. we had so many buried boxes that I swore if I ever did another job like that, I would use the adjustable boxes and zip them out 2" so they would be impossible to cover up.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Tampa, FL, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    I would use the adjustable boxes and zip them out 2" so they would be impossible to cover up.
    Good idea, but never say impossible when drywallers are involved.

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