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Thread: 250.32 (A), doubt.

  1. #31
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Jamaica and london
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    967
    Quote Originally Posted by INGMRS View Post
    Hi don,


    I do not know, I do not have so clear the idea of installing a second disconnection device for the same feeder, I have read the sections, but basically if you have access to your disconnection device, everything is fine, of course, I understand that it is recommended to have it near the building. but. How many feet (meters)?

    Regards,
    you have the disconnection under the meter... thus, since feeding with four wires from the meter post to the residence, another disconnection outside the residence is not required. But, you should probably put a disconnect in the panel. However, not required, just safer.
    Because your system is more like a trailer type of residential install it is hard to use many of the pictures to see what you need to do. Your standard practice is to both ground and main disconnect at the property line, then to feed from there with two live, a neutral, and a ground, to the panel inside the residence. This is so the utility can look for the meter easier.

    Now, if you are required a firefighter disconnect on the exterior of the home, that would be another issue altogether. But just look at it as being closest to a sub panel or a Trailer/ Mobile Home connection.
    Student of electrical codes. Please Take others advice first.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    23,819
    Quote Originally Posted by Adamjamma View Post
    you have the disconnection under the meter... thus, since feeding with four wires from the meter post to the residence, another disconnection outside the residence is not required. But, you should probably put a disconnect in the panel. However, not required, just safer.
    Because your system is more like a trailer type of residential install it is hard to use many of the pictures to see what you need to do. Your standard practice is to both ground and main disconnect at the property line, then to feed from there with two live, a neutral, and a ground, to the panel inside the residence. This is so the utility can look for the meter easier.

    Now, if you are required a firefighter disconnect on the exterior of the home, that would be another issue altogether. But just look at it as being closest to a sub panel or a Trailer/ Mobile Home connection.
    The NEC rules very clearly require a disconnect at the residence.
    Don, Illinois
    (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Jamaica and london
    Posts
    967
    The NEC requires a Main Disconnect and the grounding point to be there. The main disconnect is at the residence property line.

    The main disconnect for mobile homes is not at the mobile home but at the meter disconnect usually. But best policy is to use a main disconnect in each panel, however this is not the service disconnect, but the panel disconnect.
    There is a difference due to the install differences...

    In most cases in the Caribbean at least, the difference in distance from the service disconnect below the meter to the first panel in the home is around 50 feet.

    It is kind of like the regional differences in the USA with panels in basements, panels in hallways and panels on the outside of the buildings...
    225.32 Location. The disconnecting means shall be installed either inside or outside of the building or structure served or where the conductors pass through the building or structure. The disconnecting means shall be at a readily accessible location nearest the point of entrance of the conductors. For the purposes of this section, the requirements in 230.6 shall be utilized.


    The Caribbean usually justifies this readily accessible location nearest the point of entrance to be the meter post under the meter, unless the locality requires a firefighters disconnect, in which case they normally install it under the following European directive:

    537.4.2.2 Every firefighter's switch should comply with the following requirements, where applicable: (i) for an outdoor installation, the switch should be outside the building and adjacent to the equipment, or alternatively a notice indicating the position of the switch should be placed adjacent to the equipment and a notice should be fixed near the switch so as to render it clearly distinguishable (ii) for an indoor installation, the switch should be in the main entrance to the building or in another position to be agreed with the local fire authority (iii) the switch should be placed in a conspicuous position, reasonably accessible to firefighters, at not more than 2.75 m from the ground or the standing beneath the switch. 537.4.3 A firefighter's switch shall be easily visible, accessible and marked to indicate the installation or part of the installation which it controls.


    Now, local codes change Island to Island and in other countries as well around the world as differences or amendments to the basic NEC codes, just as there are differences in the NYC and Chicago codes. Based upon what the local authorities deem more applicable to their own requirements, since the NEC plainly states it is not a design book but a guideline of best practices.
    Student of electrical codes. Please Take others advice first.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    san jose, Costa Rica, code NEC USA
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by Adamjamma View Post
    The NEC requires a Main Disconnect and the grounding point to be there. The main disconnect is at the residence property line.

    The main disconnect for mobile homes is not at the mobile home but at the meter disconnect usually. But best policy is to use a main disconnect in each panel, however this is not the service disconnect, but the panel disconnect.
    There is a difference due to the install differences...

    In most cases in the Caribbean at least, the difference in distance from the service disconnect below the meter to the first panel in the home is around 50 feet.

    It is kind of like the regional differences in the USA with panels in basements, panels in hallways and panels on the outside of the buildings...
    225.32 Location. The disconnecting means shall be installed either inside or outside of the building or structure served or where the conductors pass through the building or structure. The disconnecting means shall be at a readily accessible location nearest the point of entrance of the conductors. For the purposes of this section, the requirements in 230.6 shall be utilized.


    The Caribbean usually justifies this readily accessible location nearest the point of entrance to be the meter post under the meter, unless the locality requires a firefighters disconnect, in which case they normally install it under the following European directive:

    537.4.2.2 Every firefighter's switch should comply with the following requirements, where applicable: (i) for an outdoor installation, the switch should be outside the building and adjacent to the equipment, or alternatively a notice indicating the position of the switch should be placed adjacent to the equipment and a notice should be fixed near the switch so as to render it clearly distinguishable (ii) for an indoor installation, the switch should be in the main entrance to the building or in another position to be agreed with the local fire authority (iii) the switch should be placed in a conspicuous position, reasonably accessible to firefighters, at not more than 2.75 m from the ground or the standing beneath the switch. 537.4.3 A firefighter's switch shall be easily visible, accessible and marked to indicate the installation or part of the installation which it controls.


    Now, local codes change Island to Island and in other countries as well around the world as differences or amendments to the basic NEC codes, just as there are differences in the NYC and Chicago codes. Based upon what the local authorities deem more applicable to their own requirements, since the NEC plainly states it is not a design book but a guideline of best practices.
    Hello,


    I agree with you that the code is not a design book, it is a guide to the best practices to have an installation as secure as possible. So, here is my question: if we do not use CR metal pipes for water or gas (because we use PVC), and 95% of the electrical installations are in PVC conduits, and the house does not have lightning protection, what is ? The purpose of this second rod? I mean, on the load side there is a grounding bar on the board, and this bar is connected by an EGC to the electrode in service, and this electrode is connected to the neutral point On the service side, therefore, there is already a direct route to the source to eliminate any ground fault. Why a second electrode?


    As Mike Holt says in his videos, more "ground" is not necessary the best. in this case the most important is the fourth wire to connect both sides, the load with the source, (of course, this is my opinion).


    Regards,

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