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Thread: VFD drives in a C1D2 area

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    San Luis Obispo
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbalex View Post
    Option 2 is fine. Just make sure that it cuts the entire classified envelope. That is, make sure that there is no 18 or 24” high classified envelope that commonly extends from the source beyond the edges of the barrier. See API RP 500, Figure 30 for example. Another option if an extended envelope exists is to raise the equipment above it.
    Much thanks for the response i was thinking in the same lines
    But i missed the article Figure 30.

  2. #12
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    I agree with Bob. You are essentially eliminating the classified location with whatever you build, may be some details involved in assuring you actually eliminated the need for classification in that particular space.

    An advantage of a room instead of a smaller hazardous location rated enclosure is some enclosures can be quite expensive and you possibly get more bang for your buck if you have additional items that may need to be separated from the hazardous location and could be located in that room (now or down the road).

    Much thanks for the response.
    Since few different locations on the platform, which makes the enclosed building even more harder, so barrier is a much better way to pursue.

  3. #13
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    Apr 2012
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    San Luis Obispo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    DINNy

    One of the fairly critical aspects, as you are probably aware, is adequate cooling if the VFDs are to be located in a sealed building or enclosure, that can be a challenge. Especially with these quite big drives. I usually allowed for 2.5% losses.

    We supplied some VFDs for use in coal mines also quite large. These were mounted in a finned cast iron enclosure which were generally described as explosion proof but actually they would let hot gasses escape if the pressure was great enough. The technique was to make the flanges on the enclosures wide enough to sufficiently cool the hot gasses.
    Thanks for the input, i understood this part, if we were going to put a enclosed building we were either going to specify a C1D2 rated AC or regular ac to be located in the unclassified area.

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