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Thread: MC in PVC healthcare

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    MC in PVC healthcare

    I have patient care area in which branch circuit to power the equipment is at the bottom so they are running a PVC underground. However, PVC underground will not comply per NEC 2014 Article 517.13. So they came up with the idea to run MC cable in the PVC. The PVC is buried in concrete underground. Would this be code violation and would MC cable lose its redundant ground if their is a jacket surrounding it which is imperious to moisture i.e.. suitable for wet location? Do they even make such MC cable for healthcare?

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    Plain MC would not be compliant in the first place, it does not meet the requirements of 517.13(A).

    You will have to find a MCAP or HCF cable listed for use in damp or wet locations and I'm not aware of any.

    The PVC idea should be abandoned for a metalic raceway.

    Roger
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    Quote Originally Posted by hhsting View Post
    I have patient care area in which branch circuit to power the equipment is at the bottom so they are running a PVC underground. However, PVC underground will not comply per NEC 2014 Article 517.13. So they came up with the idea to run MC cable in the PVC. The PVC is buried in concrete underground. Would this be code violation and would MC cable lose its redundant ground if their is a jacket surrounding it which is imperious to moisture i.e.. suitable for wet location? Do they even make such MC cable for healthcare?
    There is PVC coated MC cable for healthcare out there. If you can get it or not may be another story.

    https://www.southwire.com/ProductCat...rodcatsheet710

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    Quote Originally Posted by packersparky View Post
    There is PVC coated MC cable for healthcare out there. If you can get it or not may be another story.

    https://www.southwire.com/ProductCat...rodcatsheet710
    Max it goes is #8 awg and EGC insulated is AL. No higher in size?

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    Quote Originally Posted by hhsting View Post
    Max it goes is #8 awg and EGC insulated is AL. No higher in size?
    The aluminum conductor is bonding the metal sheath making it an EGC. I also has a separate copper insulated EGC. I don't know about the size of the cable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hhsting View Post
    I have patient care area in which branch circuit to power the equipment is at the bottom so they are running a PVC underground. However, PVC underground will not comply per NEC 2014 Article 517.13. So they came up with the idea to run MC cable in the PVC. The PVC is buried in concrete underground. Would this be code violation and would MC cable lose its redundant ground if their is a jacket surrounding it which is imperious to moisture i.e.. suitable for wet location? Do they even make such MC cable for healthcare?
    Funny I was just pondering a similar situation:
    Does a wiring method still need to comply with 517.13 after it leaves the 517.1 'health care facility'. In my case I need to run a branch circuit to a small medical office exam room under a multi use office building, the panel for the clinic is in a remote room. 517.13(A) Applies to wiring methods 'serving' patient care spaces, so yes it has to be metallic with redundant ground all the way to the panel. In my case there is crawl space so I can run EMT, in yours I would run IMC or rigid.
    Time to get the bender out.
    Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by hhsting View Post
    Max it goes is #8 awg and EGC insulated is AL. No higher in size?
    What branch circuits in patient care areas need a conductor larger than #8?

    Look at the info again, the aluminum runner is not insulated and is not by itself an EGC, it is a shunt for the sheath coils.

    Roger
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    Can I use galvanized steel EMT in floor slab?

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

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    Despite the OP stating feeder, based on some of then follow-up it sounds more like a feeder.
    If so, I don't believe redundant grounding is required
    At my age, I'm accustomed to restaurants asking me to pay in advance, but now my bank has started sending me their calendar one month at a time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by augie47 View Post
    Despite the OP stating feeder, based on some of then follow-up it sounds more like a feeder.
    If so, I don't believe redundant grounding is required
    I think your first "feeder" should be "branch circuit"?

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