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Thread: Showing Lighting Controls on Drawings

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tw1156 View Post
    Want to know how to solve all of this in the future? We need to make a return back to task lighting. Task lighting in the energy code is exempt. Provide minimal general lighting with some EM and be done with it. It will then trigger less luminaires in the space, and in turn, also be exempt for portions of the energy code due to wattage/sq.ft being below certain thresholds. I'm thinking the old 5fc requirement from 1903 will do just fine.
    i love task lighting.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve66 View Post
    Lighting controls have obviously become much more complicated than they used to be.

    Has anyone found a good way to show exactly what you want on a bid set of drawings?

    I know manufacturers usually provide detailed shop drawings that show wiring and all the devices and connections. But they can't do that until they understand what I'm expecting.

    Its easy to show all the power wiring, and device locations. But that doesn't convey which lights make up a zone, or which switches and sensors control which zone.

    And then there are also many different options for each zone: manual on, auto on, time control, daylight control, dimming, and on and on.

    So what is the easiest and best way to show this?
    I've created lighting control detail sheets, with a bunch of wiring diagrams that are particular to a certain room and give them tags, then put those tags on the lighting plans.

    For example: a room tagged with "A" references detail "A" on a separate sheet, which is a wiring diagram containing a room controller, sensor, low voltage switch, etc. and a note below it as to what the functionality is intended to be (if there are scenes). A room with "B" might have two sensors, two controllers, etc. Many rooms duplicate, so you can reuse the same details and tags in different rooms.

    I also show the components on plan but no connections, just for installation location.

    I've never had a problem doing it this way and a lot of contractors have emailed/called thanking me for how easy they are to follow.

    Hope that helps.

  3. #23
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    That sounds like a good idea also.

    I'm still hashing out the schedule idea. It does seem to be somewhat of a pain to schedule every room when many of them have very basic controls. For example, many restrooms and storerooms just have a simple wall sensor. But the schedule does give me a chance to list Manual On or Auto On, which the plan wouldn't normally show.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve66 View Post
    That sounds like a good idea also.

    I'm still hashing out the schedule idea. It does seem to be somewhat of a pain to schedule every room when many of them have very basic controls. For example, many restrooms and storerooms just have a simple wall sensor. But the schedule does give me a chance to list Manual On or Auto On, which the plan wouldn't normally show.
    What about using a riser diagram like us fire alarm folks do? It's a great way to get an overview of the project and see how all the moving parts fit together, at least in a general sense.

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