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Thread: Oil insulated cable

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    23

    Oil insulated cable

    I am trying to find some information about terminating oil insulated 15kV cable. In particular the time needed to make a termination. I will be splicing new 15kV EPR insulated to existing oil insulated 15kV cable and will need to terminate each type then connect them together.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Indianapolis
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    Re: Oil insulated cable

    We use a lot of PILC (paper insulated, lead covered) which is oil impregnated. If I am not mistaken, we use a splice where we can splice, install the oil stop, and insulate with a single kit (I am not sure of this statement). If you would like, I can check tomorrow to see if really can do this. Our system is a 15 kV grounded wye system (13.2 kV).
    Charlie Eldridge, Indianapolis, Utility Power Guy
    Responses based on the 2011 NEC, unless stated otherwise.

  3. #3
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    Feb 2003
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    Alabama
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    Re: Oil insulated cable

    Charlie
    I think bh is speaking of a different type of cable. I believe the cable in question is enclosed in a pipe filled with oil as insulation.
    The cable is terminated in a splice box with oil with copper bus installed. The EPR is also terminated and connected to the copper bus. It is a fairly complex operation and time consuming.
    You may want to contact Okonite for assistance.

  4. #4
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    Re: Oil insulated cable

    Now you are talking about something I have never heard of.
    Charlie Eldridge, Indianapolis, Utility Power Guy
    Responses based on the 2011 NEC, unless stated otherwise.

  5. #5
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    Re: Oil insulated cable

    Charlie
    What I am referring to is Oil-O-Static Cable.
    I searched Google but no luck. I do not think is it used any longer.

  6. #6
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    Aug 2004
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    23

    Re: Oil insulated cable

    This is an application in China and I don't know for sure what kind of cable they use. I was told it was oil impregnated paper but I am not 100% sure if that is correct. I am waiting to find out exactly what they use.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    388

    Re: Oil insulated cable

    Have seen the paper insulated,lead covered (PILC) cables with oil-impregnated paper insulation that charlie mentions.

    Seems like an article in EC&M thirty or so years ago spoke of an oil-filled cable assembly used to send 69KV from the mainland underwater to an island.
    It was somewhere on planet Earth.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Bremerton, Washington
    Posts
    6,631

    Re: Oil insulated cable

    On a related note, there is a code article for Integrated Gas Spacer Cable, is it still available and what is it used for?
    Moderator-Washington State
    Ancora Imparo

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    274

    Re: Oil insulated cable

    This may help if you in fact have PILC cable. Trifurcating Splice

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4

    Re: Oil insulated cable

    "Oil-o-static" is a trade name used by Okonite Cables, NJ. This type of cable is genericly called "pipe type cable" and normally used only at 69kV and above. It is basically three paper insulated cables in a steel pipe pressurized with a "dielectric fluid" to about 200 psi. This is mainly a system used in the USA and the Americas for HV and EHV utility power transmission up to 345kV.

    Oil filled cable also called "hollow core cable" or "Pirelli cable" has as the name implies a hollow conductor used as a fluid supply channel to pressurize the cable. These cables have been used in the US at 35kV and above but are used a lot overseas possibly as low as 15kV and up to 230kV for bulk power transmission. These operate at pressures ranging from 15 to 200 psi.

    PILC or "Paper Lead Cable", (also called "solid cable"), is an oil impregnated paper insulation that has an outer jacket of lead and usually some plastic over that, on the newer ones anyway. There is no pressurizing source for the oil so it operates at atmospheric pressure. This type has been used all over the world at 5 to 35kV since shortly after Thomas Edison did his thing. I have seen samples from as early as around 1910.

    Terminating and splicing PILC usually requires solder wiping the accessory to the lead jacket of the cable to form the outer seal. While terminating and splicing EPR is done by hand taping, heat shrinking or cold shrinking (zipper) methods.

    You can join EPR to PILC by building a suitable oil barrier on the PILC cable end, so the oil doesn't bleed into the EPR. There are special splice kits available for this. Our you can build two terminals and attach them through a bus. Depends if you are in a manhole, ditch or on a pole.

    Good Luck!

    EHV Mark

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