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Thread: KVA to MVA

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    1

    KVA to MVA

    How to convert KVA to MVA? Probably a stupid ?

  2. #2

    Re: KVA to MVA

    Nothing is stupid ! just divide by a 1000

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    North Texas, DFW area
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    Re: KVA to MVA

    So... a 7,500 KVA transformer = 7.5 MVA transformer, right?

  4. #4

    Re: KVA to MVA

    right!

  5. #5
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    Seattle, WA
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    Re: KVA to MVA

    The "M stands for one million. The "K" stands for one thousand. That's why Basra's formula works.
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  6. #6
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    Charlotte, NC
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    Re: KVA to MVA

    It is a small k (kVA)

  7. #7
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    Re: KVA to MVA

    Zog,

    That's the way I learned it, also.

    Inside a sentence the "k" of kVA is like any other first letter of a word.

    V is short for Volt, a man's last name;

    A is also short for a man's last name, Ampere.

    Being short for proper names, "V" and "A" are capitalized.
    Another Al in Minnesota

  8. #8
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    Re: KVA to MVA

    Originally posted by al hildenbrand:
    V is short for Volt, a man's last name. . . .
    Being short for proper names, "V" and "A" are capitalized.
    His name was Alessandro Volta.

    The "V" and "A" do not stand for names, even though the words they represent were chosen to honor two persons. The letters stand for the common words (not proper words, not capitalized) "volt" and "ampere." The authors of many textbooks have chosen to use capitalized letters "V" and "I" to represent the phasor quantities of voltage and current, and the lower case letters "v" and "i" to represent the same quantities as functions of time. The letter "A" (or "a") is not used to represent either current or amperes. It is only used as part of the symbol for apparent power (VA) or the symbol for reactive power (VAR), with or without a preceeding quantifier (e.g., "K" or "M" or "G").

    The lower case letter k" is used more frequently to represent "kilo-," but it is not incorrect to use the upper case "K."
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  9. #9
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    Location
    Minnesota
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    Re: KVA to MVA

    Oops. Thanks, Charlie. :o So much for my learning and/or my memory.
    Another Al in Minnesota

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Mission Viejo, CA
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    Re: KVA to MVA

    The US Nation Institute of Standards and Technology has some very interesting reading about the International System of Units (SI). It does state the “k” prefix is lowercase. The “A”(a basic unit) and “V”(a "specially named" derived unit) are officially uppercase when referenced in a formula. I usually don’t make a big deal about either issue except in technical papers.

    One of the most fascinating things to me is that most of the basic SI units (meter, kilogram, second, ampere, kelvin, mole, and candela) have been defined or officially redefined in my lifetime
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    "I know that you believe you understand what you think the NEC says, but I am not sure you realize that what you read is not what it means." (Corollary to Charlie's Rule)

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