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Thread: Diversification Factor

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Diversification Factor

    When sizing a load for an industrial facility, is there a diversification factor that can be applied to lower the size of the utility service that is needed. If so where in the NEC?
    I have always based the service size on "Connected Load" and the Utility does what they want.
    The only people that I know of that use diversification factors is Dominion Virginia Power (Our Local Utility).

  2. #2
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    Re: Diversification Factor

    From my experience the electrician or engineer provides the load to the utility and they will apply a diversity factor to the load. The resultant load is usually much lower that the caculated load per the NEC. Why are you concerned
    about this issue?

  3. #3
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    Re: Diversification Factor

    Bob,
    I had the question posed to me by a customer and I told them essentially the same thing as you just stated. I was just trying to get another opinion. People in this forum have always provided good and "very helpful" information.

  4. #4
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    Re: Diversification Factor

    If you’ll forgive my being a bit picky, then please allow me to suggest the term “demand factor” as being more to the point. This is the term used to compare the maximum load you actually see on a day-to-day basis with the total connected load. The term “diversity factor” is too esoteric for ordinary use, and of interest only to designers of large scale power systems.
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  5. #5
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    Re: Diversification Factor

    Charlie B,
    Its not being picky if it means being more correct in the use and application of terms.
    "Diversification Factor" was a term used by the Virginia Power rep that I spoke with when he was explaining how they size their cable and transformers.

  6. #6
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    Re: Diversification Factor

    I have long believed that there is a big difference between what I call “conversational English” and what is commonly called “technical communications.” In the former, we can be casual (translate “imprecise”) in our use of terms, so long as we are alert to the possibility that we might be inadvertently mis-communicating. In the later, we should make an effort to be precise. This requires us to do one of two things: (1) To use words and phrases only in the context of their accepted definitions, or (2) Start the communication by defining how we plan on using the words or phrases.

    I suspect the utility rep was employing conversational English, when he used the phrase “diversification factor.” It is not a standard engineering term. The closest sounding term in standard use is “diversity factor.” This factor is, in fact, of interest to a utility, but not in the context of sizing a single transformer. If he were compelled to use the precise terminology of technical communications, I believe he would have called it a “demand factor.”
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  7. #7
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    Re: Diversification Factor

    Nomenclature is the basis for a lot of discussion and mis-communication on this forum. On one hand we may use the best description we know for something-- but it's short of the accepted nomenclature. Then the thread goes haywire based on the different interpretations of the question and answers-- all based on our own vocabulary or based on mutual nomenclature. Knowing the nomenclature of your trade can really help when conveying a concept-- as long as the recipient is in possession of the identical nomenclature. If you are speaking the same language-- if you are on the same page a clamp is a clamp whereas a connector is something else entirely. When both parties are using the same nomenclature you can really get to the grist easily (i.e.- a 4-square metal special deep box actually means a particular box). There are few misunderstandings.

    In a forum like this with people from all over the world and with different levels of expertise it's hard to get the nomenclature on a mutually understandable plane. I like nomenclature (naming conventions). When it works it works well. Once you are misunderstood it's hard to get out of the ditch and get a helpful answer to your question. We need to understand a question properly before we can answer it properly.

    ../Wayne

    PS: A Mike Holt Code Forum GLOSSARY link might be helpful. That way we can point to the Glossary and ask "is this what we are talking about"? A Glossary would be very helpful to me. Actually, as good as this web site is, it's probably already here and as yet undiscovered by me.

    >>>>
    Main Entry: no·men·cla·ture
    Pronunciation: 'nO-m&n-"klA-ch&r also nO-'men-kl&-"chur, -'me[ng]-, -ch&r, -"tyur, -"tur
    Function: noun
    Etymology: Latin nomenclatura assigning of names, from nomen + calatus, past participle of calare
    Date: 1610
    1 : NAME, DESIGNATION
    2 : the act or process or an instance of naming
    3 a : a system or set of terms or symbols especially in a particular science, discipline, or art b : an international system of standardized New Latin names used in biology for kinds and groups of kinds of animals and plants
    - no·men·cla·tur·al /"nO-m&n-'klAch-r&l, -'klA-ch&-/ adjective <<<<

    [ September 08, 2003, 02:38 PM: Message edited by: awwt ]

  8. #8
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    Re: Diversification Factor

    I don’t think we need anything formal. When I see a mis-communication in the making, I usually stop and say something like, “I think I see where we’re getting confused. When you say ‘O-Fin,’ do you mean ‘Orphan’ (a person who has lost his parents) or ‘Often’ (frequently)?”
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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