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Thread: overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    434

    overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

    What is the thoery behind prohibiting overcurrent devices in residential bathrooms? I have cited a builder, new home and just finished the basement and they decided to leave the twin 200,s in the newly created bathroom. I have givin them several reasons why you cannot. What are your thoughts? Thanks!
    Greg......moving to Viginia

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO NEC: 2014
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    15,380

    Re: overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

    triphase, welcome to the forum.

    First off, your job is to walk in and inspect, and if you cite the violation (in this case, 240.24(E)) then the electrician needs to fix it because it's against code. Officially, that's the reason.

    I will add to your question: Why no breakers in clothes closets?

    I had this discussion with my coworker just the other day. I didn't have a good reason for that, either.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    17

    Re: overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

    Let's not forget 230.70(A)(2).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    520

    Re: overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

    an uneducated guess would be that clothes closets get crammed with junk and the accesibility issue comes in to play?
    bathrooms hmmm water issues locked door? long showers limit access time
    Democracy
    5 wolves and a lamb voting what to have for dinner

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    741

    Re: overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

    as for the water issues, they can be in sink closets, or outside. hmmmmmm

    as for long showers, there i can see the steam being a problem. but, i too am just taking a guess.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    New Jersey
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    18,924

    Re: overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

    What if they just built a closet around the panel with a door? Would it still be in the bathroom?
    Rob

    Chief Moderator

    All responses based on the 2011 NEC unless otherwise noted

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    434

    Re: overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

    George thanks, I never back down and will not unless Iam wrong "and this case not" #1 door can be locked #2 steam can damage breakers, buss, terminals (3R does not prevent that rain but not a "rolling" steam) #3 flammable chemicals ie. hair spray etc. #4 possibly in the vicinity of easily combustible items clothing closet/linens, etc. #5 posible working clearances ie. over a lav, toilet "seen that before" I just like to provide reasons for my own education and wanted to other opinions in case I am missing something. Also, thank You for the welcome!
    Greg......moving to Viginia

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    16,898

    Re: overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

    I think it must be from homeowners who were complaining that electricians were using the bathoom without permission, just because they were in that room working on the panel. A few rude electricians ruined it for the rest of us.
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    434

    Re: overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

    I should have done a spell check on that last reply, hope you don't think bad of me being the new guy. Charlie, thats a good one Iam going to use that in the future. Hope you don't mind ?
    Greg......moving to Viginia

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO NEC: 2014
    Posts
    15,380

    Re: overcurrent devices in residential bathroom

    Originally posted by triphase:
    George thanks, I never back down and will not unless I am wrong...
    If you stand your ground when you're right and admit it when you are wrong, then you're a good inspector.

    #1 door can be locked
    The lock on the door to any room containing a panel containing overcurrent devices would be a violation of 240.24(A) (as applying the definition of "readily accessible" compared to "accessible", as found in Article 100), so that removes it from the bathroom discussion.

    #2 steam can damage breakers, buss, terminals (3R does...prevent...rain but not a "rolling" steam)
    I believe this to be the source of the requirement.

    #3 flammable chemicals ie. hair spray etc.
    I don't believe the NEC considers a bathroom to be a hazardous location. That's a stretch.

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