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Thread: Section 110.14(A)

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Florida
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    Section 110.14(A)

    Proposal: Remove the FPN from above 110.14(A) and place it in the text as a requirement for terminal connections.

    "...or smaller conductors. All terminations shall be made per the manufacturers tightening torque listing or labeling."

    Substantiation: FPN's are not enforceable and the requirement of 110.3(B) is too general as torques specifications are commonly overlooked.

    I plan on contacting several manufacturers of torque tools to get an annual sales account verses other common electrical tools. I predict sales of torque screwdrivers and wrenches are well bellow what you would expect for a tool needed for every panelboard and overcurrent device made. I have given seminars to over 500 electricians in the state of Florida and recall only a handfull claiming they own a torque tool of some kind. I even asked this on this forum without much results.
    Bryan P. Holland, MCP

  2. #2
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    Re: Section 110.14(A)

    I'd support this one in principal and reword as follows:

    "Terminations shall be torqued per the manufacturer's instructions."
    What this wording will do is require the product standards to include torque requirements, and any other unique issues if necessary, as part of the manufacture's instructions. Believe me, NEMA & UL will pick this up, especially if you say suggest they do.

    You may also want to contact Jim Pauley at Square D for support. He was the primary originating author of 110.14(C). Theoretically 110.14(C) could have been enforced through 110.3(B) too; but so many folks were unaware that it became desirable to include it directly in the Code.
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    "I know that you believe you understand what you think the NEC says, but I am not sure you realize that what you read is not what it means." (Corollary to Charlie's Rule)

  3. #3
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    Re: Section 110.14(A)

    I'd be willing to bet very few electricians even know there is a torque spec on terminations. Its why UL requires UL listed control panels have a specific label indictaing what that torque requirement is for each wire coming into a UL listed control panel.

    Not that I believe anyone actually uses a torque wrench to tighten up their connections, except maybe on larger wires.
    Bob

  4. #4
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    Re: Section 110.14(A)

    I think the concept is great; however, how does the AHJ enforce this new rule? One of the basic tests is whether or not something is enforceable, this is not. The AHJ can not "test" the torque without ruining the original torque. With aluminum conductors, the re-torque would further deform the conductors.

    This is one that I really like but I don't know how to do it. :confused:
    Charlie Eldridge, Indianapolis, Utility Power Guy
    Responses based on the 2011 NEC, unless stated otherwise.

  5. #5

    Re: Section 110.14(A)

    Hello-

    The MFG of breakers can install "shear screws when the proper torque is applied, but is this what we want?

    STEVE
    STEVE
    Electrical Project Manager for comm. co.
    LA. CA.

  6. #6
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    Re: Section 110.14(A)

    Torquing is a requirement already. Every time one installs a panel, there are torque requirements labeled inside of the enclosure.

    We are supposed to follow manufacturer's installation instructions - 110.3(B)

  7. #7
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    Re: Section 110.14(A)

    We are supposed to follow manufacturer's installation instructions - 110.3(B)
    No!...We are required to follow the instructions included in the listing and labeling. These are not the same as the manufacturer's instructions. However, the torque requirements are listing and labeling instructions and must be followed per 110.3(B)
    (B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling.
    Don
    Don, Illinois
    "It is the first responsibility of every citizen to question authority." B Franklin

  8. #8
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    Re: Section 110.14(A)

    I have been told by a UL representative that every screw, bolt, and nut are torqued for the UL tests. It makes no difference whether it is on a circuit breaker, receptacle, bus bar, or anything else. If it has threads and is required to be used for assembly, it gets torqued.
    Charlie Eldridge, Indianapolis, Utility Power Guy
    Responses based on the 2011 NEC, unless stated otherwise.

  9. #9
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    Re: Section 110.14(A)

    Originally posted by don_resqcapt19:
    We are supposed to follow manufacturer's installation instructions - 110.3(B)
    No!...We are required to follow the instructions included in the listing and labeling. These are not the same as the manufacturer's instructions...
    (B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling.
    Don
    Don...I agree with you, but I found this link very interesting, which is from UL and seems to disagree with both of us...

    THIS SITE

    QuestionAre the installation instructions
    part of the UL Listing?
    Are all Listed products required
    to have installation instructions?
    Are installation instructions
    reviewed by UL?


    AnswerInstallation instructions
    are considered to be a
    part of the UL Listing.
    The UL Standards for Safety used
    to investigate products contain
    specific requirements regarding
    the content and appearance of the
    instructions. Installation instructions
    are not required to be
    marked with the UL Mark, but
    they are required to be provided
    with the product bearing the UL
    Mark. Some products are not required
    to have installation instructions
    when the National
    Electrical Code contains all the
    necessary installation requirements,
    such as outlet boxes.
    UL staff reviews the instructions,
    both during the initial evaluation of
    the product, as well as during the
    continual Follow-Up Service at the
    factories. The clarity of the instructions
    is also reviewed.
    Edited to include text from thread

    [ October 26, 2004, 09:19 AM: Message edited by: ryan_618 ]
    Ryan Jackson, Salt Lake City
    Inspector, Instructor

  10. #10
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    Re: Section 110.14(A)

    Originally posted by charlie:
    I think the concept is great; however, how does the AHJ enforce this new rule? One of the basic tests is whether or not something is enforceable, this is not. The AHJ can not "test" the torque without ruining the original torque. With aluminum conductors, the re-torque would further deform the conductors.

    This is one that I really like but I don't know how to do it. :confused:
    Charlie I couldn't agree more. I also think the idea is great, but there is no way that I can do this as an inspector.
    Ryan Jackson, Salt Lake City
    Inspector, Instructor

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