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Thread: Amp Connectors and 334.40(B)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    flying splices

    Has anyone seen the conector from AMP . Amp claims it meets NEC 334.40b
    code requirement for eliminating junction boxes. Does this really mean that you can eliminate a junction box when reworking an old installation?
    I had seen this type of connector on a mobile home once. I wonder how good they are?
    http://www.ampnetconnect.com/product...07&bpn_id=5425_id=5425

  2. #2
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    A few years ago, a buddy of mine remodeled his kitchen. He opened up a common wall to the powder bath & there were 2 of the biggest fly taps I've ever seen. When I grabbed a wire nut on several neutrals, the wire nut disintegrated in my hand. The conductors were discolored & brittle. My friend was not too far from an unpleasant mess. Just say NO to fly taps. BTW, he has a standing order from me that any time he does even the slightest electric remodel, I want to see what the previous HO/DIYer did.
    May your electrons flow forever, and mine, one day longer! Ron

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sierrasparky
    Has anyone seen the conector from AMP . Amp claims it meets NEC 334.40b
    code requirement for eliminating junction boxes. Does this really mean that you can eliminate a junction box when reworking an old installation?
    I had seen this type of connector on a mobile home once. I wonder how good they are?
    http://www.ampnetconnect.com/product...07&bpn_id=5425_id=5425
    Don't know what nec says about these but they use them to connect sections of modular homes. They are accessable until the ho or contractor finishes the basement ceiling.
    industrial electrician/electrical contractor

  4. #4
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    Thumbs down

    I've seen those AMP and MOLEX type connectors buried in the marriage walls in double-wide mobile homes and modular houses.

    I would not use such a connector in my house, as I have been called on to repair too many failed connections in new houses.

    When the failed connections were buried in the wall, and inaccessible, we ended up having to back-feed the circuit with a new home-run, and abandon the original circuit feeder.

    I don't recommend them.:mad:

  5. #5
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    I separated these new posts out from an 2 year old thread that we closed.

    Please feel free to continue the discussion here. :smile:

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Fort Collins, CO NEC: 2014
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    I agree with the above, flying splices are to be avoided and removed at every opportunity.

    The last time devices like these came up, they were approved only for mobile home use. I wonder if this has changed? :confused:

  7. #7
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    I had noticed this product in a recent issue of ec&M. Amp claims to comply with the current code.
    I am always asked by the most affluent people "can't you just bury the box"
    I just don't want to be a liar as I have alwas said " code say's you cannot"
    If this device is allowable to fished in a wall and concealed as the code states. Then I would be lying to the customer about being able to bury a splice behind the drywall. If these are code compliant I guess I can say Yes if you use this device but they do fail from time to time.

    In the old days if a customer asked to move a box It was sure eaisier with flex conduit, I would just extend it and pull in longer wires. Done deal..

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sierrasparky
    If this device is allowable to fished in a wall and concealed as the code states. Then I would be lying to the customer about being able to bury a splice behind the drywall. If these are code compliant I guess I can say Yes if you use this device but they do fail from time to time.
    You can always say that it's just like stab-wiring with #14: yes, it's legal, but I wouldn't do it.

    I don't like stab-wiring; however, I confess that I have used the T-tap twice, and both times for the exact same thing: adding a recessed (clock) receptacle behind a wall-mounted flat-panel TV.

    The load is a known quantity, and not an entire circuit's load. The alternative would be two J-boxes with an added piece of cable between them, because there's little slack along the existing cable run.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    240
    That's the first time I've seem one of those. I view that the same as stab connections. I never use stab nor would I use this. I think wire nuts hanging free is safer then this.
    Maryland

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    4,016
    I have seen them , never have used them , might not either. I wonder how many hundreds of thousands there are in field and of those how many fail. Life and all it encompasses is chock a block full of failure, the question is are these things more likely to fail than the other things and what happens when they do.

    The code article is 334.40 (b)

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