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Thread: How to convert tons to BTU

  1. #1
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    How to convert tons to BTU

    According to the information I have, a ton is equal to 12,000 BTUs. Is this correct? To convert a BTU to a watt, do I have to divide it by 3,414? Thank you.

  2. #2
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    1 watt= 3.412 BTU

  3. #3
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    Here is a quote from another thread

    Quote Originally Posted by lowryder88h

    If you don't have all the spec's but you know the tonage, I use this rule of thumb for calc's. 1 ton = 12000 BTU

    1 watt= 3.412 BTU


    ex. 4 tons x 12000 BTU = 48000 BTU


    48000 div by 3.412 = 14068 watts

    14068 div by 240v = 58.6 amps

    Its not a percise science but it will get you into the ball park.

  4. #4
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    3.412 or 3,412 boy that sure could mess up a calculation.
    Brian John
    Leesburg, VA

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Well, sort of:

    Let's be exact:

    1 ton of cooling is equivalent to 12,000 BTU/hour

    which is equivalent to melting a ton of ice over 24 hours.

    It is improper to equate power to energy! You should say,

    1 watt-hour (energy) = 3.412 BTU (energy)

    You cannot compute current draw this way because the AC pumps heat from one area to another. This is true whether you are heating or cooling with the AC unit. If you know the S.E.E.R. rating of the unit you can compute the power input. You can then compute the current draw if you know the PF of the unit.

    Do a search on S.E.E.R. for more.
    Don't mess with B+!
    (Signal Corps. Motto)

  6. #6
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    For quick roundoff results....3.5kW= 1 Ton
    a 4 Ton x 3.5= 14,000/240= 58 something
    This figure of course does not include seasonal EER adjustments either.
    rbj, Seattle...Safety is a Professional Courtesy.

  7. #7
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    4 tons, 58 amps? Something seems a little off. Generally we find that 1 ton will have a load of about 8-10 amps. I guess that this figure represents lower ampacities due to the SEER rating.
    Rob

    Chief Moderator

    All responses based on the 2011 NEC unless otherwise noted

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    For the Record:

    Quote Originally Posted by infinity
    4 tons, 58 amps? Something seems a little off. Generally we find that 1 ton will have a load of about 8-10 amps. I guess that this figure represents lower ampacities due to the SEER rating.
    FYI, my 40 year old 3-ton Night/Day unit drew 19A @ 240V. Haven't checked the new one.

    Yes, you must consider the SEER number or your results will be grossly high.
    Don't mess with B+!
    (Signal Corps. Motto)

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