Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 54

Thread: Most profitable electrical skill??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    BF PA
    Posts
    493

    Question Most profitable electrical skill??

    What is the most profitable electrical skill in the industry? Solar, Lightning protection, I&C, Communications, Automation, Residential construction, Others?

    What skill has the biggest demand for people?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    54
    A good experienced Trouble Shooting Specialist.

    For Example: Customer today called, been w/o A/C for 4 days( We've had a lot of bad weather & lightning storms) No power to 3 phase A/C Condenser. He originally called a big ad out of the Yellow Book, ARS aka, American Residential Service, A/C Tech said no power & then called their house electricians(aka Rip Off)
    House Electricians said wire was cut & wanted to cut out sheetrock etc. to look for bad splice or wire. He even was walking on the roof 3 stories up.

    So, I show up and find a 100a Fused 3 phase disconnect outside, next to 2 other 240 v 40 cir. single phase panels. One 3 phase Condenser is perfectly OK, the other is dead. So, I'm asking where the other breaker panel is? HO Says, there isn't one. No one else know of one or ever seen one. HO has lived there for 10 years. I said, "I'll find it!" An Hour later, after opening every cabinet & closet, 8000ft/sq house, I find a 100a Zinsco panel, in an attic closet buried behind boxes and winter clothes, mounted 2 feet AFF. 3P 30a Breaker had tripped.

    HO was ready and willing to run new wires, tear out whatever necessary, at what ever cost, to have a cool master bedroom tonight!
    I knew what I was looking for, I knew I'd find it and I told the HO I would.

    This HO is a Multi Millionaire, Trust fund family money, and I'll charge him the same as a poor customer on Social Security.
    Jeff Weissman - Master Electrician
    Lone Star State

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    7,266
    Design and Consultation is by far #1.

    Project Bidding is likely #2.

    Private Third-Party Inspection is perhaps #3.

    People that get paid for what they know make much more and provide much more profit to an organization than what can be made for what you can actually do.
    Bryan P. Holland, MCP

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Right here.
    Posts
    12,326
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Weissman Electric
    A good experienced Trouble Shooting Specialist.
    Took the words right out of my mouth. Electrical installer's are a dime a dozen (sorry), but a troubleshooter is a rare cat, and is worth a King's ransom. I could hire guys all day long to work on an electrical construction job, but it's very hard to get a good guy for a service truck. Even when you do find a good trouble man/service guy, finding one that's "normal" (family man, not a drunk, stable social life, etc) can be a challenge. They almost don't exist.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Beautiful IDAHO
    Posts
    48
    I don't think you'd have any trouble finding a good trouble shooter if your willing to pay. I'm an E&I Electrician for a large industrial plant and my job is primarily trouble shooting. Anything from PLC's, VFD's, to Instrumentation, and general power and lighting. I'd leave in a heart beat if a General contractor offered a decent wage. Problem is the top wage for that kind of work never seems to be much over $18-20.00

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Miami Fla.
    Posts
    6,882
    Quote Originally Posted by khixxx
    What is the most profitable electrical skill in the industry?
    Keeping yourself and others safe and happy to work many more profitable days.

    I also agree that trouble shoot guys are pretty rare around these parts.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Right here.
    Posts
    12,326
    Quote Originally Posted by solaeros
    I don't think you'd have any trouble finding a good trouble shooter if your willing to pay. I'm an E&I Electrician for a large industrial plant and my job is primarily trouble shooting. Anything from PLC's, VFD's, to Instrumentation, and general power and lighting. I'd leave in a heart beat if a General contractor offered a decent wage. Problem is the top wage for that kind of work never seems to be much over $18-20.00
    Yes, the factories and industries are where good troubleshooters are born and bred, in my estimation. A factory maintenance man or factory electrician are among the perfect candidates to drive a service truck for an electrical contractor. Trouble is, working within the four walls of a factory kind of spoils a guy. Take that however you want to.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    BF PA
    Posts
    493
    Quote Originally Posted by solaeros
    I don't think you'd have any trouble finding a good trouble shooter if your willing to pay. I'm an E&I Electrician for a large industrial plant and my job is primarily trouble shooting. Anything from PLC's, VFD's, to Instrumentation, and general power and lighting. I'd leave in a heart beat if a General contractor offered a decent wage. Problem is the top wage for that kind of work never seems to be much over $18-20.00
    No doubt. I use to do E&I, I left to work for a EC that had lots of Prevailing wage jobs $36/hr. well about 2 years later I am back to normal wage $18/hr I lasted about 3 months. I am back at I&C.

    I left E&I because I would get bored. I would walk the plant aimlessly looking and searching for potential problems. oh yes those truck drives a crossed town are what I miss the best. Construction there was always something to do.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    5,465
    I too would also say troubleshooting, but my personal opinion on it is that if you can design a circuit you can troubleshoot one of equal to the same complexity. I guess I would also differ in the idea that they are "born" or "bred". Anyone capable of doing a simple algebra problem can be TAUGHT to troubleshoot IMO. The problem is in finding one willing to learn, or for that matter take on the reponsibility of doing it once they do. A lot of people don't want the challenge after being generally discouraged from a wide range of hassle that can come along with the task. Service calls have other issues that I am not too fond of - driving, off-hours work, picky and impatient people, locating nearly impossible to find repair parts - if it were not for those things I would like it...
    Electric heretic
    It's always gonna be in the last place you look....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    seattle wa
    Posts
    23
    if you know how to troubleshoot you deserve more money.anybody can run pipe and pull wire.but if you know the how and why it works is the key .but having the pleasuare of seeing the coustumers happy faces when you tell them you fixed the problem .then you show them then bill and the call you a theif. that puts the icing on the cake.
    real love is having your wife push a fishtape to you in a hot panel
    Alamo Electrical Services

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •