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Thread: Drilling around corners

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Central Jersey
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    Drilling around corners

    Looking for suggestions when your roughing out a house and you want to drill ( wood studs)the corners of the room to run your wire instead of going up and then going down to the next device box.

    I try matching the holes I drill but seem to have a rough time routing my wire (mostly romex) thru.

    Any suggestions would help.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Apr 2007
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    Lilburn Georgia
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    long nose pliers.... Also, when you have two or three studs stacked in that corner strip off insulation 8 inches, cut off all but one wire and use that to fish around the corner.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Vinnie, using an angle-head drill helps make the two holes meet at less than 90 degrees, rather than more. You can remove more debris by running the drill back in both holes a second time.

    Bend the end of the NM cable in a smooth hook that looks most like it matches the pathway of the intersecting holes and use finess when feeding it around the corner. If necessary, use a pair of needlenose pliers like Andy mentioned.

    If you must strip the cable and remove two of the wires, use a bit of tape to taper the cable where the sheath ends, so you don't snag the edges of the holes. The cut wires will not curve around the bend very easily.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  4. #4
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    I always drill the two holes at a 45 degree angle. One hole gets angled down the other hole gets angled up. This even works when using AC or MC cable.
    Rob

    Chief Moderator

    All responses based on the 2011 NEC unless otherwise noted

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    I don't bother trying to go around a corner if it's solid wood. I go up a stud, through the top plate and over to where I go back down. Maybe more wire, but I don't spend half a day trying to save 2 bucks worth of 14/2.
    But here's how I was taught to do this:
    Take your dykes and cut the black & white wires off through the sheath at a 45° angle, leaving just the bare ground. Do the cuts far enough back to have plenty of bar ground wire to get through all the studs you need to.
    You should end up with this:

    Cut sheath at 45°------\
    ------------------------\
    =========Black Wire===\
    ========Ground=============================
    =========White Wire==/
    ------------------------/

    It's a lot easier to get one wire through at first, then the others will follow. Use black tape at the cut if necesarry.

    I hope this makes sense.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2007
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    Val Vegas, GA
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    i've had to do this a few times. i cut off all but the ground wire, as mentioned above. i'll put a small hook on the end and bend the wire to get through the hole. usually there's a gap between the corner, so i'll take another piece of wire, put a hook on it, and push it through the other end to catch the other wire. it's always worked.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    Have used angle drill bits with good results. Rather than two through holes with the auger (what I was taught) I can find and clean up the opening in a couple corner holes pretty well. I think I'm parroting Larry's comments. They look like a three blade auger bit but only 1/4 inch deep, and do not last long after hitting nails. But I've fed 1/2 inch AC through 90s in 4X4s using this method.

  8. #8
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    If it's really a problem, just use your auger to completely remove the wood to make a notch, lay in the cable, and use a couple of nail-plates to protect the wire.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    5,465
    It's rare for framers to use a post in a corner, often it is a single and double stud, with a single outside - wait I need to draw this.....

    Take a short bit on a right angle and drill as much as you can into the corner in the direction of the other wall to reduce the angle. And yes, take careful aim to either align the holes or aim the so the point intersect in the corner - as this works on solid corners too - but you may not know if its solid or not until you drill it...

    Then make two hooks both with a slight arch to them, and hook them in the corner. After many years of practice with that, you may even find it easy to to increase the arch in a fish wire or even a whole cable and work it easily right into the other hole.

    Anyway, use Larry's advice on notching if you want to have horrorfied looks from the Framers - and get the knick name "The Butcher", and on some sites even thrown off the job.... Notching is frowned apon in many circles. And there are framing codes about how much wood can be removed from bearing framing, that percentage is much less when it applies to a notch instead of a hole.

    infinity's advice sounds interesting, I may even give it a shot....
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    Electric heretic
    It's always gonna be in the last place you look....

  10. #10
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    I have used E57's method quite a bit in the past (I have not pulled wire in a few years) and only experienced problems once in a while. Prerouting the installation during boxing usually help to elminate some of the annoying situations, especially with the types of construction we find today (very complex in some installs).
    Instructor, Industry Advocate

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