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Thread: Drilling around corners

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO NEC: 2014
    Posts
    15,472
    Quote Originally Posted by LarryFine
    If it's really a problem, just use your auger to completely remove the wood to make a notch, lay in the cable, and use a couple of nail-plates to protect the wire.
    Bingo - you're gonna wind up using nailplates anyway, you might as well get your money's worth out of them. :cool:

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    3,159
    Quote Originally Posted by georgestolz
    Bingo - you're gonna wind up using nailplates anyway, you might as well get your money's worth out of them. :cool:
    That's my helper's attitude. I think he doesn't like to put the box back on the truck. He sees a hole, on goes the nailplate!
    John from Baltimore
    "One Day at a Time"
    Responses based on the 2008 NEC

    If you can stay calm, while all around you is chaos...then you probably haven't completely understood the seriousness of the situation

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO NEC: 2014
    Posts
    15,472
    What I mean is, if you're drilling around a corner, you will have to drill at some angle if using an 18" auger bit, because the overall length of the bit and drill are going to be greater than the bay between studs (assuming 16" O.C.)

    So, if you're drilling at an angle, the first studs drilled through are going to probably be closer to the surface of the stud than 1.25", and require a nailplate. If intentionally drilling super shallow and fairly in line with the face of the wall results in ten seconds of cable installation and only costs you an additional 2 or 4 nailplates, versus trying to save nailplates and adding a few minutes to the installation of the cable, then the choice seems clear to me.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Planet macmikeman
    Posts
    3,037
    Forstner (sp ?) bits make a nice hole for this, no burrs to hang up on. A bit of wire lube on the cable end helps a bunch, and yea, notching the inside corner when all else fails and nail plates, your on your way. You would be amazed how much time you can cut with a small tub of yellow 77 on the job. I go ape with nail plates on kitchen and bath walls where ever cabinets will be installed. Cabinet installers used to be craftsmen. Now they are the guys with a box of 2-1/2" screws, cordless drill, and a constant hangover.
    Last edited by macmikeman; 07-29-07 at 05:45 PM.
    85deg. an Sunny today.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    69

    Talking

    You can always use a Benford T-5000 with a Toro, 2500 directional Flexi 5/8" auger bit system!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    545
    You can use Milwaukee Pathfinder bits:

    http://www.toolup.com/productinfo.as...-B546EDF8F196}

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    4,258

    Structural integrity

    Until I started to learn carpentry I really didnt care how or where I drilled beams and studs. Just as we dont want sheetrockers to destroy our wires with screws and rotozips framers do not want us making swiss cheese out of thier structural framing members. I just use as small a bit usually 3/4 to 1 and drill center of stud at right angles taking care to line up the holes. Once you get the feel of pushing a wire into a hole until it bends in the direction you want then feedit in untill it stops.you can usually grab it with the blade of my sheetrock saw which i allways have in my pouch anyway and pull it out. I dont want to depend on nailplates unless I have to. I would not want someone notching a corner of a loadbearing wall all the way to the center on my new house. I think that I would step on thier neck for doing something like that. I am probably one of the nicest electricians to carpenters because I also do carpentry to fill in whenever I am slow and I can see what a sheetrockers next move is. I dont want them wrecking my stuff and vice versa. There is a building code guide which explains how large and where you can drill but most electricians I know dont give it a second thought and even normal drilling would not pass the stricktest inspection/. I almost forgot to mention Ideal makes short sharp auger bits when used in an angle drill are great and are not too big to burn out cordless drills also. 3/4 x3" ships auger kicks butt but stay away from nails.
    Last edited by quogueelectric; 07-29-07 at 10:25 PM.
    The tail does NOT wag the dog.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    21,838
    Quote Originally Posted by jdsmith
    You can use Milwaukee Pathfinder bits:
    Yes, but they provide limited advantage in exterior walls unless you're there to drill the corners before the sheathing is applied. Note the picture in the case:

    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    4,258

    pathfinder

    I bought a set of these bits a FULL set and they are not in my opinion more than a novelty. I am a huge fan of milwaulkee however these bits are hardly ever used and at this point I use them as a garbage sheetrock bit. Thier self feed bits are unsurpassed but pricey and almost never go on sale because once you use them you will not want any other bit set. I have a 3/4 and 2in and use them almost daily
    The tail does NOT wag the dog.

  10. #20
    if your on the ground floor, or other convenient location, and there are studs say 5" to 10" away from the corner so it makes it impossible to use ordinary 6" or 18" augers, i will measure and drill from the exterior. saves sorting thru the various extentions.

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