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Thread: High Voltage splicing training

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Ca
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    High Voltage splicing training

    I recently got my J-mans licence and was looking to get certified for high voltage splicing. There is some high voltage work around here but almost no splicers. I used to work for the POCO, but did mostly overhead. I had some exposure to underground but did not get much hands on splicing experience. I have a basic understanding and know all the safety and grouning prodcedures

    I was wonder if there were any good schools where I could get certified? Our company has about 80 guys and the only guy that could do high voltage left the company about a year ago.

  2. #2
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    Feb 2006
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    High voltage splicing

    Quote Originally Posted by DIRT27
    I recently got my J-mans licence and was looking to get certified for high voltage splicing. There is some high voltage work around here but almost no splicers. I used to work for the POCO, but did mostly overhead. I had some exposure to underground but did not get much hands on splicing experience. I have a basic understanding and know all the safety and grouning prodcedures

    I was wonder if there were any good schools where I could get certified? Our company has about 80 guys and the only guy that could do high voltage left the company about a year ago.
    The only place that I have ever seen classes are through the IBEW union hall the last class for lead wiping was in 1991 in my area of which I was in myself. There have been plastic splicing classes but there is nothing quite like a lead wipe where you pour 1000 *degree molten lead into your gloved hands and mold it like melted ice cream into the shape you desire as it cools to a mere 600 *degrees and the colors changing can tell you how hot the lead is it is freaky. Setting your partners blueprints on fire with the acetylene torch........priceless.
    The tail does NOT wag the dog.

  3. #3
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    Wouldn't Okonite , 3M, RayChem (Raytheon?)or one of the other manufactures of cable/terminations offer a class ...for a price.


    Being "certified" is a different classification that being "qualified".
    Certification will cost more than being qualified.
    Certification implies (IMHO) that you are able to certify others who will teach classes on being a qualified spilcer, whereas qualified means you are trained to do perform the task(splice).
    ĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦ
    ««« CELTIC »»»
    ĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦ
    An error on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part.8-)


  4. #4
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    Mar 2007
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    MidWest
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    try this

    This is what I could find as far as I know it is probally one of the best places to start.

    The NCSCB (National Cable Splicers Certification Board)
    below is a link to an article in EC&M

    http://ecmweb.com/market/electric_vo...mediumvoltage/

    Hope this helps. I do not know if anyone requires this yet but it sounds like what you are looking for.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    MidWest
    Posts
    688

    try this

    This is what I could find as far as I know it is probally one of the best places to start.

    The NCSCB (National Cable Splicers Certification Board)
    below is a link to an article in EC&M

    http://ecmweb.com/market/electric_vo...mediumvoltage/

    Hope this helps. I do not know if anyone requires this yet but it sounds like what you are looking for.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    NJ
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    “In the two-and-a-half years that we've been working on this, we've talked to a lot of different groups — from engineering to utilities — and not one person has said, ‘I don't know why you're doing this.’ This is long overdue.”

    The NCSCB will offer three separate certifications: the installation of medium-voltage, hand-taped splices and terminations, paper-insulated lead-covered cable (PILC), or lead certification.

    Certification is still strictly voluntary but may soon become a de facto standard in the industry. “One thing people will be assured of is that once they get somebody with this certification, that person will have at least demonstrated that they know what's involved in this type of work,” Anderson says.
    Voluntary Certification for Medium-Voltage Cable Splicers...from link above.

    I am a "qualified" MV splicer..have been since 1989 ...took 2 seperate courses from 2 different employers ~ up to 25KV. I have worked "kit terminations" (typically what you would see in new work) and hand taped/lead splices.

    I am "on the fence" with this certification....it's voluntary but NOT required: - Would this mean a person like myself would need to be re-certified (although I am ONLY "qaulified" as detailed previously)? Is there any "grandfathering"? (MY "CON" view)
    - Establishing a nationwide minimum standard that can be accessed through some sort of database to enhance one's employability is a good thing(My "PRO" view)

    Of course, these are just my opinions and are subject to change
    ĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦ
    ««« CELTIC »»»
    ĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦĦ
    An error on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part.8-)


  7. #7
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    Feb 2005
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
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    Our splicers have all had this training. One advantage is Raychem offers a 10 year warantee on splices intalled by certified splicers. It also seperates you from the other non-certified guys.

  8. #8
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    Feb 2006
    Location
    new york
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    Plastic kits

    Are fairly simple to follow the installation instructions.If you understand the basic principles of a stress cone and the stresses that high voltage puts on insulation a lot of this is common sence to a trained individual. Manhole safety procedures seem like a lot of overkill and to an untrained individual as I have said before you may get away with something 99 times without a problem but that 100th time you dont get lucky you and your partner are dead duck. Some of the gasses found in manholes bond with blood molecules much faster and easier than oxygen you may go unconcience in as short as 8 seconds and if it is the right gas you can kill your partner in annother 8 to 10 seconds. This is why you read or see evry couple of years on the news someone goes into a drywell or cesspool and drops dead and the next 2 people who go in to save them drop dead also. This gas has to be treated as you are going under water and you have to hold your breath in this environment. This is hardly an OSHA procedure but is the reality when untrained morons go dabbling into dangerous work they have no buisness doing. Sorry manhole procedures are one of my pet peeves. It doesnt have to be perfect for me but common sence goes a long way..I will throw a nice bone now for cutting cross link poly use mason line to cut the xlp if you pull the mason line back and forth it will cut through like butter and will not nick the aluminum conductor this is a bear to get off and little tricks to help make your job easier are great.
    The tail does NOT wag the dog.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    274
    One thing about manufacturer training is their real focus is on their particular kit. The most important aspect of splicing and terminating MV cable is the cable prep and I don't feel they cover that aspect well enough are also just a couple hour demonstrations. (I believe you can go to 3M training and become 3M certified if you want to spend some time in Texas) I spent 44 weeks and 6 full Saturdays learning this art. Kind of hard to cover all that info and hands on practice in a few hour seminar.
    To answer the OP... The IBEW is the only real comprehensive one I know of. You have to be a member and it is only offered at the large locals. It is too expensive to put on for the smaller locals with limited budgets.

    BTW-
    quogueelectric, the mason line trick works great on XLP but I would suggest only using white cotton line. Mason line, especially the colored stuff, can introduce contaminants.

  10. #10

    Interesting

    as a 2nd year apprentice can I become certified in HV splicing or do you need to be a JM....I'm guessing u need to be a JM but I'm sure someone can tell me.....never hurts to have an up in your field....if some other things slow down :grin: Like right now for me

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